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Edmund --

Depending on the occupational brackets you're studying, you may also want
to run the causal arrows in the other direction: people getting recruited
and promoted in part FOR the value of their networks (which are, in
economistic terms, priced into the decision). Sales, advertising, legal,
and promotion professions are obvious examples, but the nonprofit charity
sector has some of this, too (e.g., in the "development" or fundraising
occupation), and other occupational submarkets may show evidence of same.
There's a chapter on this in the Lin et al, eds., Social Capital: Theory
and Research book.

On your methodological question, it would seem possible to rely on either
quant or qual methods. With less than a zillion dollars to spend, a short
panel survey, perhaps with a flexible name generator, could track network
dynamics and the frequent or less frequent mobility events you mention (as
well as acquisition of additional human capital, credientials, etc. over
time). The firm-based stuff by Fernandez and others models some of this.

Likewise, a longitudinal qualitative study would address recollection and
other probs you mention. It doesn't sounds as though you need ethnographic
data (participant observation, informal interviewing, intensive
"shadowing") so much as rich interview data collected, formally but not in
a highly structured manner, at various points in time. The ethnographic
material becomes more important if you're tracking special populations,
such as the working poor, and working to embed network dynamics in complex
choices and "long odds." Kathy Newman's No Shame in My Game book does that.
Networks are but one facet of the larger story about the working poor in
the inner city, but the book IS mobility focused.

Or am I mis-reading your intent? Your question is helping me think about my
own work on poverty, networks, and mobility, so please keep this thread
alive if helpful to you.

Best -- Xav

Xavier de Souza Briggs
Martin Luther King, Jr. Visiting Fellow
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room 9-541
Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
(voice) 617.253.7956 (fax) 258.8594




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                      [log in to unmask]         Subject: Re: Thoughts Around Networks and Employment
                      .EDU


                      03/05/2003 11:24
                      AM
                      Please respond
                      to seidel





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Hi Edmund.

A few references come to mind (some are my work, and some others):

1)  Petersen, T., I. Saporta, and M. Seidel (2000).  "Offering a Job:
Meritocracy and Social Networks"  American Journal of Sociology Volume
106(3):763-816.

2)  Seidel, M., J. Polzer, and K. Stewart (2000).  "Friends in High
Places:  The Effects of Social Networks on Discrimination in Salary
Negotiations."  Administrative Science Quarterly Volume 45:1-24.

3)  Fernandez, R., E. Castilla, P. Moore (2000).  "Social Capital at Work:
Networks and Employment at a Phone Center."  American Journal of Sociology
Volume 105(5):1288-1356.

4)  Fernandez, R., N. Weinberg (1997).  "Sifting and Sorting:  Personal
Contacts and Hiring in a Retail Bank."  American Sociological Review
Volume 62(6):883-902

Hope that helps,
Marc-David

> Any encouragement, criticisms, references? Would the more quals
and > quants ends of the SN spectrum think it was possible to tackle this
> by quals or quants alone?
>

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marc-David Seidel
McCombs School of Business
University of Texas at Austin
Department of Management
CBA 4.202
Austin, TX 78712
E-mail:  [log in to unmask]

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