Print

Print


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****

Dear Edmund and Socnetters,

The literature on social capital contains a lot of work in this area, not
limited to the Granovetter classics. A literature search should produce
a lot of references.

For some miscellaneous references:

Tamas Bartus, "Fitting social capital, informal job serach, and labor
market outcomes in Hungary", Connections 23 (2000), 72-83
http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/Connections-Web/Volume23/23-
1Bartus/Bartus-web.htm
(the above is a single line)

Tamas Bartus, "Social capital and earnings inequalities [Online
Resource] : the role of informal job search in Hungary", PhD thesis
ICS, Univ. of Groningen , 2001, online available at
http://www.ub.rug.nl/eldoc/dis/ppsw/t.bartus/

H. Moerbeek & A. Need, "Enemies at work: can they hinder your
career"?, Social Networks 25 (2003), 67-83




Date sent:              Wed, 5 Mar 2003 15:25:14 +0000
Send reply to:          Edmund Chattoe <[log in to unmask]>
From:                   Edmund Chattoe <[log in to unmask]>
Subject:                Thoughts Around Networks and Employment
To:                     [log in to unmask]

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Dear All,
>
> I am thinking about the possibilities for linking network studies to
> social mobility in an operationalisable way. At one extreme, there
> are "regression quantitative" approaches that just look at head
> counts of associates and "wash out" what may be important
> dynamic/cohort effects of changing network size and nature. At the
> other extreme are "narrative qualitative" approaches in which the
> role of networks must be recalled, sometimes many years after the
> fact. The fundamental difficulties seem to be:
>
> 1) Getting of jobs and getting promoted (the stuff of "mainstream"
> social mobility) are rather rare events.
>
> 2) Given the odium attached to "favouritism", it may be very hard to
> access data about informal mechanisms by survey or even interview but
> "being there" (ie fieldwork) is hard to reconcile with 1.
>
> 3) There may be considerable ethical/sensitivity issues in assessing
> networks that may lead to accusations of "unfair advantage" in
> organisations. These push back towards anonymised data but to my
> knowledge there are very few surveys which would provide adequate
> data about nominated others to support this kind of quantitative
> analysis.
>
> My current thinking is to "extend" the notion of labour market
> advantage to more frequent events as contract renewal, bonus payments and
> so on, on the (perhaps rather weak) argument that similar network
> mechanisms may operate "in the large" (ie with promotion). This might make
> it feasible for extended fieldwork to capture the network situation and
> enough "instances" but problems of sensitivity and access remain.
>
> Any encouragement, criticisms, references? Would the more quals and
> quants ends of the SN spectrum think it was possible to tackle this
> by quals or quants alone?
>
> I know some of the classics like "Getting a Job" and the interlocking
> directorates research, but I think the extended dynamic nature of social
> mobility (more like "Getting One Job After Another") is rather different
> from these existing areas.
>
> ATB,
>
> Edmund Chattoe
> --
> =========================================================================
> Edmund Chattoe: Department of Sociology, University of Oxford, Littlegate
> House, St Ebbes, Oxford, OX1 1PT,  tel: 01865-286174,  fax: 01865-286171,
> http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk  Review Editor, J. Artificial Societies and
> Social Simulation (JASSS) http://www.soc.surrey.ac.uk/JASSS/ "So act as to
> treat humanity, whether in your own person or in another, always as an
> end, and never as only a means."  (Immanuel Kant, Fundamental Principles)
> =========================================================================
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/). To unsubscribe, send an
> email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE
> SOCNET in the body of the message.


*******************************************************************
Tom A.B. Snijders
ICS
Dept. of Sociology
Grote Rozenstraat 31
9712 TG Groningen
The Netherlands

Fax  +31 - (0)50 - 3636226
Tel. +31 - (0)50 - 3636188 (office)
     +31 - (0)50 - 3636469 (secretary)
     +31 - (0)50 - 3129152 (home)

E-mail     [log in to unmask]
Home page  http://stat.gamma.rug.nl/snijders/
*******************************************************************

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.