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Dear Carter,

When I wrote this, I knew I would get this response about the extent to
which the protest was organized or not. Perhaps, I should make my point a
little bit clearer then. What I meant is that I'm not sure whether mapping
the network structure of the people that demonstrated suffices to understand
this form of collective action. At a very basic level of network theorizing,
we could ask if it where cohesive networks or structural holes that made the
demonstrations possible. However, I'm not cinvinced that ties or the lack
thereof enabled this. I do think it is possible to sketch the networks of
some core actors. But, I also think that for the majority of people, the
decision to demonstrate was affected more by their individual concern about
this war then their network structure. My idea is that by approaching it
immediately from a network perspective, we're missing an important part of
the picture and that alternative explanation might be very likely as well.

In other words, I was not trying to say that network theory is not
applicable to this, because there where no formal networks at work. Instead,
I do think SNA does have something to say about this, but that we have to be
careful to regard it as the only explanation. It was just question I wanted
to raise and of course, I am very interested in responses to that.

Thanks and take care,
Ferry


Carter T. Butts writes:

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Ferry Koster wrote:
>> As far as I have seen, the people that
>> demonstrated wanted to express their feelings about this war. For a large
>> part, the only thing organized where the time, the place and some of the
>> speakers. My point is that it is possible that network theory does not
>> have
>> a lot to say about this.
>
> Even if the protest events are not formally organized, it does not
> follow that network theory has nothing to say.  (Quite the opposite, in
> fact -- these are the more interesting cases, at least to a
> sociologist.)  For a little of the past (formal) work in this area, you
> might want to see:

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