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Hi Peter,

Check this paper out for a very interesting approach to combining networks and geography. It also has some potentially useful references:

Sorenson, O. & Stuart, T. 2001 Syndication Networks and the Spatial Distribution of Venture Capital Investments. American Journal of Sociology, 106(6): 1546-1588.

Andrew
-----Original Message-----
From:   Peter Hedström [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent:   Sun 3/9/2003 7:16 AM
To:     [log in to unmask]
Cc:
Subject:             Geographical distances and socail ties

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Hello.

Many of us routinely assume that geographical distances and social ties are
closely linked to one another in the sense that the greater the distance is
between two actors the lower the probability will be that they are tied to
one another through a friendship or an acquaintance tie. This seems to be a
plausible assumption (particularly for young people), but I must admit that
I do not know of many reliable empirical studies addressing this question.
As I am currently writing about this I would greatly appreciate any
suggestions on where to look.

Best,
Peter

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Department of Sociology
Stockholm University
106 91 Stockholm
Sweden

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