Print

Print


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****

Hi David,
        In the past for introductory networks classes, I've recreated
Bavelas'
experiments on the effects of communication structure on performance in
small task-oriented groups.  I didn't actually build a table with
movable
slots as his lab did, but designated group members as particular colors
and
gave them instructions on who could communicate with whom for a
particular
set of rounds (the students mostly don't cheat).  The students usually
have
a lot of fun with the games themselves (I make it a timed-competition),
and
after they've finished with a given structure, they try to graph it, and
then answer various questions about their experience (how much they
enjoyed
their role, etc. ala Rogge's (Bavelas' student) work). On a subsequent
class day, you can analyze the data, showing the effects of
centralization
on speed and accuracy, and the effects of centrality on knowledge of the
structure and their enjoyment with a given role.  All in all, I was
usually quite pleased with the results, though setting up the
experiments
can be time-consuming.

Bavelas, A. (1950). Communication patterns in task-oriented groups.
Journal of
the Acoustical Society of America, 22, 271-282.

        Also appears in Group Dynamics (1968, 3rd ed.), edited by
        Cartwright and Zander, pp. 503-511.

Best regards,
Tim Brazill.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Timothy J. Brazill, Ph.D.
Human Services Department
California State Univ., Fullerton
800 N. State College Blvd.
Fullerton, CA 92834
(714) 278-5065

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.