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I have the old East York data to check this. Geographical distance between
Egos and their network members. It needs good modeling. I'd love for
someone to take it on, as I am focused on Internet stuff.

Speaking of which, everything I look at suggests that the majority of
personal emails (non-spam, non-list) are "local" -- 50 km (30 miles) or so
-- but I don't have East York quality Ego data on this. Yet.

 Barry
 ___________________________________________________________________

  Barry Wellman        Professor of Sociology       NetLab Director
  [log in to unmask]   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman

  Centre for Urban & Community Studies        University of Toronto
  455 Spadina Avenue   Toronto Canada M5S 2G8   fax:+1-416-978-7162
 ___________________________________________________________________

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> Subject:  SOCNET Digest - 13 Mar 2003 to 14 Mar 2003 (#2003-58)
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> There is one message totalling 127 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Geographical distances and socail ties
>
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> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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> Date:    Fri, 14 Mar 2003 12:14:27 -0500
> From:    Xavier de Souza Briggs <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Geographical distances and socail ties
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> A number of studies--I think of them as being solidly at the intersection
> of network analysis and community sociology--treat this as a question of
> localism.
>
> Much research assessed the positive case for spatial proximity (through
> selection effects of neighborhoods, propinquity in social contact, and
> more), rather than greater distance as a social barrier. And the findings
> cut in several directions, as best I can tell: certain subgroups probably
> continue to have quite spatially embedded ties (so their spatial and
> personal communities overlap and co-embed quite a bit, see Barry's East
> Yorkers' research and a nifty article by Yancey et al, Racial and Ethnic
> Studies journal 1985, also Kadushin and Jones on networks in NYC
> neighborhoods). Most folks close personal ties are not spatially proximate
> (now a golden rule in this networks biz), but this seems to be less true
> for the poor, less true again for the racial minority poor--and downright
> wrong for young people in that category cuz space effects vary across the
> life course, adolescents more likely to have strong neighborhood ties). I
> review much of this in "Brown Kids in White Suburbs" (on my website), cuz
> much research on social ties didn't help me figure out the lives of poor
> minority youth who relocated across space. Space matters less when bridging
> social categories, so black and white neighbors can be quite isolated from
> each others' lives (though not economic or political fortunes) and probably
> have a harder time assembling "collective efficiacy" that depends not only
> on ties but proximate trust and expectations that others will cooperate in
> common endeavours. That insight, that spatial proximity does not a social
> neighbor make, goes back to Gans and mid-century neighboring studies, many
> of them on the urban/suburbanism-as-ways-of-life debate.
>
> And the twists go on, tapping homophily, life stage effects and other
> factors that are "not" space but mediate its effects on social relations.
>
> I'm looking at the distance and separateness (segregation) as barriers
> factors in a new Social Science Research Network working paper. It mines
> quant and qualitative work but offers (only) large-scale surveys to extend
> what we know on this thicket of questions. Some of the stats still in
> progress, but exchange and comments most welcome (put this in your browser:
> "Bridging Networks, Social Capital, and Racial Segregation in America").
> Love to hear what else you turn up.
>
> -- Xav
>
> Xavier de Souza Briggs
> Martin Luther King, Jr. Visiting Fellow
> MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
> 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room 9-541
> Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
> (voice) 617.253.7956 (fax) 258.8594
>
> "I am not content with a place to sleep.
> What I want is a thousand places to dream." (Miro')
> ___________________________________________
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> To:[log in to unmask]
> CC:
>
> Subject:Re: Geographical distances and socail ties
>
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Hi Peter,
>
> Check this paper out for a very interesting approach to combining networks
> and geography. It also has some potentially useful references:
>
> Sorenson, O. & Stuart, T. 2001 Syndication Networks and the Spatial
> Distribution of Venture Capital Investments. American Journal of Sociology,
> 106(6): 1546-1588.
>
> Andrew
> -----Original Message-----
> From:   Peter Hedström [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> Sent:   Sun 3/9/2003 7:16 AM
> To:     [log in to unmask]
> Cc:
> Subject:             Geographical distances and socail ties
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Hello.
>
> Many of us routinely assume that geographical distances and social ties are
> closely linked to one another in the sense that the greater the distance is
> between two actors the lower the probability will be that they are tied to
> one another through a friendship or an acquaintance tie. This seems to be a
> plausible assumption (particularly for young people), but I must admit that
> I do not know of many reliable empirical studies addressing this question.
> As I am currently writing about this I would greatly appreciate any
> suggestions on where to look.
>
> Best,
> Peter
>
> ______________________________________________
>
> Department of Sociology
> Stockholm University
> 106 91 Stockholm
> Sweden
>
> Phone: + 46 - 8 - 163128
> Mobile: + 46 - 708 - 163128
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