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Current issue of Scientific American, May 2003, addresses the very basics of this issue in the "Scale-Free Networks" article by Barabasi and Bonabeau.

It would be interesting to see the differece in network structures/metrics between the profitable and 'near-bankrupt' airlines... although I'm sure their success, or lack of it, is not based purely on their network topology.

The basic hub-and-spoke data is in the back of each airlines' in-flight magazine, just got to find some poor schlep to enter it all!  The actual customers flying each link, during various time periods, is probably a highly guarded secret by each airline, so you would have to guestitmate by counting the number of scheduled flights on each link, or something like that.

Good Luck!  Let us know what you find out.


Valdis

P.S. The full text of the SciAm article is only available to subscribers on-line.



---- Wolf Bob <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Dear SOCNETers
> Has anyone turned social network analysis on the airline industry?  Possibly
> regarding either airports or final destinations as nodes and flight segments
> or passenger volume as links?  I would be interested in any related papers
> and possibly to connect with those who have done work in this area.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Bob Wolf
>
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