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Doug:

Valdis has provided a nice diagram of the TB situation and more recent
work from CDC has demonstrated the direct effectiveness of using SNA to
"discover" connections between cases in an outbreak (or endemic
situation), thereby prioritizing the persons to seek out and test.  Such
connections would not be visible with standard methods.  There are a
number of areas for intervention that could be base on SNA.  These
include (STD 2001;28:63-68):

1, Segmenting networks in which transmission takes place (closing
bathhouses and shooting galleries is a good example, but you would be
correct in saying that there is a certain obviousness to that).

2.  Influencing central figures in a network structure

3.  Group interventions with small networks

4.  Network informed approaches to enrollment in risk reduction activities

5.  Network-informed contact tracing and investigation (as with TB above).

6.  Network-generated behavioral messages (counseling about concurrency,
for example).

In addition, the use of periodic network evaluation as a tool for
program efficacy is a potential area for development.  I guess
"development" is the primary word here--much of this is as yet not fully
demonstrated, but I think they do touch on areas where SNA can be used
directly and that traditional tools might not work as well.

Rich

Doug Bryan wrote:

>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
>I certainly see how SNA is useful after the fact, to study how a contagion
>spread.  But are there any interventions arrived at though SNA that could
>not be arrived at using other, simpler diagnostic methods?
>
>Doug Bryan
>[log in to unmask]
>http://pavg.stanford.edu/people/bryan
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Valdis Krebs" <[log in to unmask]>
>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>Sent: Sunday, April 27, 2003 5:05 PM
>Subject: Re: spread of SARS
>
>
>
>
>>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>>
>>Yes, Andrew quite a few SNA folks[many of them are on this list] are
>>working in this, or similar areas.  Here is a quick example of how SNA
>>was used with the spread of another airborne contagion: TB.
>>
>>-- http://www.orgnet.com/contagion.html
>>
>>There was a presentation on this TB outbreak at the most recent Sunbelt
>>by Mackenzie Andre of the CDC.
>>
>>Valdis
>>
>>
>>Andrew Waterman wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>>>
>>>This PowerPoint presentation shows that the spread of SARS can be
>>>
>>>
>understood
>
>
>>>through network-theoretic analysis, one could say almost as much as the
>>>spread of SARS can be understood through biology.  Fortunately the SARS
>>>epidemic is in its early stages, and tracking its point-to-point spread
>>>
>>>
>is
>
>
>>>still tractable.
>>>
>>>My questions are these: Can we network theorists contribute any important
>>>insights to the fight against SARS?  Have network analyses in the past
>>>helped organizations like the CDC and the WHO?
>>>
>>>Thanks,
>>>Andrew Waterman
>>>(Symbolic Systems M.S. student at Stanford University)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>-----Original Message-----
>>>From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]]On
>>>Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
>>>Sent: Sunday, April 27, 2003 9:22 AM
>>>To: [log in to unmask]
>>>Subject: spread of SARS
>>>
>>>
>>>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>>>
>>>Here is a CDC presentation that includes some of the network dynamics of
>>>the spread of SARS... including a network graph [slide 9] around one
>>>"super-spreader".
>>>
>>>  http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/sars/ppt/globalsars.ppt
>>>
>>>Valdis
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>
>_____________________________________________________________________
>SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
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>

--
Richard Rothenberg, MD
Professor
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine
Emory University School of Medicine
69 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive  SE
Atlanta, GA 30303
email: [log in to unmask]
tele: 404-616-5606
fax: 404-616-6847