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In a message dated 4/15/2003 11:52:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, [log in to unmask] writes:
On this point, has anyone explored marriage across race, class, religion, etc. lines as a builder of bridging social capital?  Two families are networked together, whether they want to be or not, and even if they resist, there's usually some times formed.  I'm confident that cross-race and religion, and probably class (given the expansion of higher education) marriages have increased over the last 100 years.

Steven Sherman
> Steven Sherman's interesting point about Putnam's overestimation of
> communal sensibilities in the past is nicely illustrated in Jason Kaufman's
> new book *For the Common Good? American Civic Life and the Golden Age of
> Fraternity.* The book is directly addressed at Putnam's work and argues
> that the types of organizations touted by Putnam were actually divisive and
> exclusionary, especially along the lines of race, class,
> and gender.
>
> Danielle Kane

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