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Dear Colleagues,

I have been attempting to put together a list of principles of creating
and maintaining a network, and I wanted to pass it by you for your
comments, additions or subtractions.

1. A network is not an end in itself. It is created and maintained in
order to facilitate the flow of information, services, resources or
products.
2. One cannot say that one "has" a network. A network is a dynamic
entity and needs constant nurturing through intensive and sustained
interactions.
3. Advantages of Weak and Strong Links. Weak links are most effective if
the information that you need or the knowledge that you wish to transfer
is reasonably simple. Strong links are more effective for more complex
messages, or if you are trying to achieve behavioral change.
4. A "boundary spanner" is useful. Having someone who can bridge the two
networks will facilitate network building and exchange.
5. Identifying a core person, champion, or core node is useful. Making a
strong link with a core node who has strong links within their own
network will facilitate network building and the exchange between
networks.
6. Network analysis can identify gaps which can be filled with linkages.
7. One can evaluate the effectiveness of a network through procedural
outcomes such as number of contacts, number of shared projects, number
of exchanges, and a transformation of information to make it
context-specific to the receptor network.

Many thanks
Dee Kramer

Dee Kramer, MES, MSc, PhD.
Knowledge Transfer
Institute for Work & Health
481 University Ave., Suite 800
Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2E9
Tel: (416)927-2027, ext. 2146
Fax: (416)927-4167
Email: [log in to unmask]




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