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Andy, et al
This strikes me as (smart) surmise by Diamond
And not empirically grounded.
Has he searched HRAF for example?

 Barry
 _____________________________________________________________________

  Barry Wellman         Professor of Sociology        NetLab Director
  wellman at chass.utoronto.ca  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman

  Centre for Urban & Community Studies          University of Toronto
  455 Spadina Avenue    Toronto Canada M5S 2G8    fax:+1-416-978-7162
             To network is to live; to live is to network
 _____________________________________________________________________

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004, Andy Smith wrote:

> Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2004 10:48:24 -0800
> From: Andy Smith <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [SOCNET] fractals and threshold points
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Doug,
>
> In his book _Guns, Germs, and Steel_, Jared Diamond writes about a similar
> subject, breaking down social complexity based on size of the group. His
> results extended to three tiers:
>
> Size: Dozens
>   Basically bands, no fixed home, "Egalitarian" leadership, no real
>   bureaucracy, no laws, unstratified culture.
> Size: Hundreds
>   Tribes, a single home, "Egalitarian" or "Big Man," organized reesource
>   extraction, still unstratified
> Size: Thousands
>   Chiefdoms, many homes, castes and classes, cronyism and monarchs,
>   bureacracy and laws, taxes, indentured labor, slavery, public
>   architecture, luxuries for the elite.
>
> These examples, by the way, are taken from a presentation by Raph Koster
> concerning competitive and cooperative structures in online worlds,
> available
> here (appears to be IE only):
> http://www.legendmud.org/raph/gaming/smallworlds.html
>
> - Andy Smith
>
>
> Doug Fraiser wrote:
>
> >Fractal theory has brought out that in many natural systems, the
> >system's pattern of organization is constant over a certain range in
> >scale but changes at particular threshold points.  Has anyone
> >experimented with the idea that patterns of social networks are likewise
> >constant over a certain range of scale (e.g., within groups ranging from
> >5 to 500 members) but change at particular threshold points (at
> >approximately 500 members, in the previous example)?
> >
> >Thanks,
> >
> >Doug Fraiser
> >
> >
>
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