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I agree completely.  I don't think that anyone on the task force would
argue that the list is perfect or particularly substantively
sophisticated.  I think that they (and Council) WOULD argue that it's a
substantial improvement over the old list.  The pattern in the past was
that everytime a new framework was proposed, it was greeted with a chorus
of objections (like the ones that we are discussing now), and so the
effort to change bogged down.  In the case of this framework, it was sent
back to the task force multiple times for revision.  Council
finally adopted it to effect SOME positive change.  They are committed to
responding to changes more quickly in the future.  So, figure out where
you want to put social networks, write a memo to me, and I'll show it to
Council.  And get more qualitative people to select social networks as an
area, now that it is a concrete possibility.
     Cheers, Lynn


On Sun, 30 Oct 2005, Charles Kadushin wrote:

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> The co-membership is a typical social networks type of analysis. Shows
> that quantitative analysis is not the whole story and that some
> theoretical perspective is useful.
>
> Barry Wellman wrote:
>
> >*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> >
> >On behalf of Lynn Smith-Lovin
> >
> > Barry
> > _____________________________________________________________________
> >
> >  Barry Wellman         Professor of Sociology        NetLab Director
> >  wellman at chass.utoronto.ca  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman
> >
> >  Centre for Urban & Community Studies          University of Toronto
> >  455 Spadina Avenue    Toronto Canada M5S 2G8    fax:+1-416-978-7162
> >             To network is to live; to live is to network
> > _____________________________________________________________________
> >
> >
> >---------- Forwarded message ----------
> >Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 10:23:11 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
> >From: Lynn Smith-Lovin <[log in to unmask]>
> >To: Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>
> >Cc: social networks list <[log in to unmask]>
> >Subject: Re: ASA specialty areas?
> >
> >Dear Barry (and others),
> >     Yes, almost every field has some problems with where it is
> >placed....the basic structure was an analysis (very nicely done, by Jim
> >Ennis) of where fields overlapped most in terms of co-membership (i.e.,
> >choice of both fields by the same reseacher).  I agree with everything
> >substantive that Barry has said, about the richness and basic insights of
> >network research....and about the wide range of methods that are
> >applicable to network analysis.  Any classification scheme has flaws: I'm
> >just happy to have social networks in the list.
> >     Cheers, Lynn
> >
> >
> >On Sun, 30 Oct 2005, Barry Wellman wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >>News comes slowly to the north country. We have to give those dog teams a
> >>rest break.
> >>So I belatedly am reading the Sept-Oct issue of the AmSocAssoc Footnotes
> >>in which 77 speciality areas are laid out.
> >>The good news is that Social Networks is one of them.
> >>The puzzling to bad news is that it is list under the Broad category of
> >>Quantitative Approaches (along with math soc, quant soc, stats and
> >>micro-computing).
> >>There are 2 reasons why this is bad:
> >>1. Many social network analysts are qualitative, either ethnographic or
> >>archival.
> >>2. We've spent 30+ years developing social network analysis as a
> >>fundamentally different theoretical approach. Methods are important to
> >>SNA, but only in service of theory.
> >>It would make more sense to me to put SNA in with the broad category of
> >>Theory, Knowledge, Science.
> >>Lynn Smith-Lovin and Jim Ennis were on the ASA committee that did this, so
> >>perhaps they can explain.
> >>
> >> Barry
> >> _____________________________________________________________________
> >>
> >>  Barry Wellman         Professor of Sociology        NetLab Director
> >>  wellman at chass.utoronto.ca  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman
> >>
> >>  Centre for Urban & Community Studies          University of Toronto
> >>  455 Spadina Avenue    Toronto Canada M5S 2G8    fax:+1-416-978-7162
> >>           To network is to live; to live is to network
> >> _____________________________________________________________________
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >Lynn Smith-Lovin
> >Robert L. Wilson Professor of Arts and Sciences
> >Department of Sociology
> >Duke University
> >348A SOC/PSYCH Bldg
> >Box 90088
> >Durham, NC 27708-0088
> >919-660-5786
> >
> >Home:
> >813 Berkeley St
> >Durham NC 27705
> >919-416-1033
> >
> >_____________________________________________________________________
> >SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> >network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
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> >
> >
>
> --
>
> Charles Kadushin
> Distinguished Scholar, Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies
> Visiting Research Professor Sociology
> Brandeis University
>
> 212-865-4369
>
> http://www.cmjs.org//
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
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>

Lynn Smith-Lovin
Robert L. Wilson Professor of Arts and Sciences
Department of Sociology
Duke University
348A SOC/PSYCH Bldg
Box 90088
Durham, NC 27708-0088
919-660-5786

Home:
813 Berkeley St
Durham NC 27705
919-416-1033

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.