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good thouht. I don't have the time. But Janet Salaff and Chuck Tilly come
to mind. See Tilly, Trust & Rule.

 Barry
 _____________________________________________________________________

  Barry Wellman         Professor of Sociology        NetLab Director
  wellman at chass.utoronto.ca  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman

  Centre for Urban & Community Studies          University of Toronto
  455 Spadina Avenue    Toronto Canada M5S 2G8    fax:+1-416-978-7162
             To network is to live; to live is to network
 _____________________________________________________________________


On Sun, 30 Oct 2005, Michael Johnston wrote:

> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 16:14:51 -0800
> From: Michael Johnston <[log in to unmask]>
> To: 'Barry Wellman' <[log in to unmask]>, [log in to unmask]
> Subject: RE: ASA specialty areas?
>
> Hi, Barry,
>
> Yes, I agree with you that SNA is more than quantitative methods.  But,
> for some reason qualitative work does not get much recognition/support.
> About a year ago, I posted an email asking soc-netters to recommend
> qualitative social network research published after 1990.  Only one of
> the four recommendations concerned an article based solely on
> ethnographic methods:
> Dominguez and Watkins.  2003.  Creating Networks for Survival and
> Mobility: Social Capital Among African-American and Latin-American
> Low-Income Mothers.  Social Problems 50(1):111-135.  (A couple cited
> ethnographic work that helped to flesh out network analysis.)
>
> To bolster your claim that SNA deserves to be treated as a theoretical
> orientation, not as a quantitative approach, can you recommend some
> post-1990 ethnographic research that advances the field of social
> network analysis?
>
> Hoping you're able to recommend several good pieces,
> Michael
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Barry Wellman
> Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2005 6:43 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: ASA specialty areas?
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> News comes slowly to the north country. We have to give those dog teams
> a
> rest break.
> So I belatedly am reading the Sept-Oct issue of the AmSocAssoc Footnotes
> in which 77 speciality areas are laid out.
> The good news is that Social Networks is one of them.
> The puzzling to bad news is that it is list under the Broad category of
> Quantitative Approaches (along with math soc, quant soc, stats and
> micro-computing).
> There are 2 reasons why this is bad:
> 1. Many social network analysts are qualitative, either ethnographic or
> archival.
> 2. We've spent 30+ years developing social network analysis as a
> fundamentally different theoretical approach. Methods are important to
> SNA, but only in service of theory.
> It would make more sense to me to put SNA in with the broad category of
> Theory, Knowledge, Science.
> Lynn Smith-Lovin and Jim Ennis were on the ASA committee that did this,
> so
> perhaps they can explain.
>
>  Barry
>  _____________________________________________________________________
>
>   Barry Wellman         Professor of Sociology        NetLab Director
>   wellman at chass.utoronto.ca  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman
>
>   Centre for Urban & Community Studies          University of Toronto
>   455 Spadina Avenue    Toronto Canada M5S 2G8    fax:+1-416-978-7162
>              To network is to live; to live is to network
>  _____________________________________________________________________
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Francis Johnston [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2003 11:15 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Qualitative SNA
>
> Dear Soc-netters,
>
> Are you able to recommend recent (1990 or after) published ethnographic
> research that has a social network orientation?
>
> I recognize that qualitative social network research has a long history
> [for example:
> Rothlesberger and Dickson "Management and the Worker" 1939 was based on
> an observer who recorded conversations; Whyte Street Corner Society 1943
> was fieldwork; also the work by Bott and Sampson is quite famous.]  Are
> there recent works that stand out in the same way?
>
> Best regards,
> Michael
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Johnson, Jeffrey C
> Sent: Monday, June 23, 2003 10:11 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: evaluating networks qualitatively
>
> I think getting caught up in the quant/qual distinction is not going to
> resolve any of the problems of interest.  It is really a matter of doing
> a thorough job initially of a series of qualitative in-depth interviews
> to identify what is needed and relevant to the problem.  Such
> qualitative interviews can then lead to valid and relevant systematic
> network questions that can be reliably compared across all actors
> (without the inherent problems in open ended qualitative approaches of
> "just because it wasn't mentioned by an informant in an in-depth
> interview does not necessarily mean it is not important to them").  We
> had a problem like this in attempting to study informal social roles in
> networks (see  J.C. Johnson, J. Boster, and L. Palinkas. "Social Roles
> and the Evolution of Networks in Isolated and Extreme Environments". The
> Journal of Mathematical Sociology  Volume 27/Numbers2-3, (2003): pp.
> 89-122).  The use of in-depth interviews to identify these roles is
> described in:
>
>  J.C. Johnson and S. Weller. Elicitation Techniques in Interviewing.
> (2002) In Handbook of  Interview Research (J. Gubrium and J. Holstein,
> eds.), pp 491-514,  Sage:Newbury Park.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Graeme Larsen [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Monday, June 23, 2003 11:49 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: evaluating networks qualitatively
> Catherine and other SOCNET colleagues,
>
> You ask what kind of attributes i am interested in.  Well i am unsure.
> Whiltst i accept 'how' communicaiton occurs in an informal network can
> be mapped and positions quantified by SNA, the only explaination for
> 'why' they occur this way is based around the SNA quantitative
> data/paradigm.  Regarding innovations, there are many attributes related
> to the innovation, cost, advantages, drivers behind it etc etc (Rogers
> early stuff) and the type of social system it is diffused into, interest
> rates, political system, level of competition etc etc.  This is before
> we start to consider elements concerning the actors, education, value
> systems, individual drivers etc.  If occurs to me that there are all
> these complementary 'softer' issues that actually contribute to the
> network which i want to include.
>
> I hope you can make sense of this.
>
> Kind regards
> Graeme Larsen
> Doctoral Researcher
> University of Reading
>
>
>
>

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