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Hi Rick, your project sounds exciting.

If I do understand what you are doing, is you want to map and display the
relationship between people involved in the project over time. This would
naturally mean in a live project; some individuals would leave the project
and others would join, and others again would need to be included,
especially as the project moved to implementation.

As you say, your appoach will depend on whether your network diagrams are
mapping a simulation or actually both recording the current network at
specific moments in time, and the new people who either are invited in, or
want to come in.

For me there are two areas: the rules - one would be the criteria on which
new people (being a sociometrist, using the term nodes or actors is yet to
sit easily with me) join the network; and secondly, who in the existing
network is responsible for inviting/including new people into the network.

Practically, the relationships between those already in the network/project
and the newer entrants need to be facilitated. There are many ways project
leaders and existing group members, or workshop facilitators can do this.

Regards, Diana Jones

The Organisation Development Company
Better relationships - better results
+64 4 499 5559 www.orgdev.co.nz www.sociometry.co.nz

-----Original Message-----
From: Rick Davies [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: 1 December 2005 1:41 a.m.
To: Diana Jones
Subject: Re: Social simulations of dynamic networks


HI Diana

Its been hard to get the idea across...

Im Jan I will be co-facilitating a workshop attended by managers of a number
of related development projects in west Africa. In the workshop we are
trying a number of methods of trying to evolve a description of what the
"impact pathways" might look like for each of those projects. One of the
ways will be to try to evolve a network diagram, through a number of
iterations or generations of time. The network diagram will progressively
contain all the main actors a given project is working with and the linkages
between them, and their relative importance. This will trake place by asking
the workshop participants to develop a number of alternate developments to
the network each generation. I expect some parts of the network to grow and
others to be neglected. Like a tree structure, but more interconnected, more
like human geneaologies. The question in my mind is what sort of rule I
should introduce to govern the sort of network additons /changes the
participants can make each generation. For example, obviously not too many
new connections, or else it will end up as a giant very connected network,
with no obvious directionality, that could be subsequently assessed in
practice to see if reality went that way. I think I need to decide how many
new nodes could be added each generation and how many new connections, per
participant..  (I think this qualifies as a simulation, but a social rather
than matehmatical / computer simulation)

Does any of this relate to what you have been working on?

regards, rick davies, in melbourne airport

On 11/30/05, Diana Jones <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Hi Rick,
are you asking for the mathematical rules or are you asking how new people
enter existing groups and build relationships and networks?
If its the latter, I've been working in this area for a number of years,

regards, Diana Jones
www.sociometry.co.nz

-----Original Message-----
From: Rick [mailto: [log in to unmask]]
Sent: 20 November 2005 1:23 a.m.
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Social simulations of dynamic networks


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Hi all

Is anyone aware of anything that has been written on social
simulations of the growth of (social) networks over time through
the addition of new actors and new linkages, under some common
constraints. By social I mean involving a group of people in a
workshop setting, rather than using agent based simulations via
software. I am interested in finding out about the rules used, and
possibly borrowing/ adapting them for use in a project planning
workshop.

regards, rick davies
www.mande.co.uk


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--
Rick Davies (Dr)
Monitoring and Evaluation Consultant
Cambridge, United Kingdom
Phone: 44 (0)1223 841367
Fax(to email): 44 0780 1640239
Email: [log in to unmask]
See  Monitoring and Evaluation NEWS at http://www.mande.co.uk
See  Rick on the Road at http://www.mandenews.blogspot.com
See Homepage at http://www.shimbir.demon.co.uk

The Organisation Development Company
Better relationships - better results
+64 4 499 5559 www.orgdev.co.nz

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.