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Links seem to emerge for the weirdest reasons online...  this is 
happening on the you-post-your-own-video site: YouTube.

> With the latest crop of videos, a new style has emerged, though, one 
> that is at once absolutely mundane and completely postmodern: people 
> posting videos of themselves watching YouTube videos. And that's just 
> the start.
>
> One of the most discussed YouTube clips lately features a young woman 
> who calls herself pizzelle2 watching a video of another YouTube user, 
> who is watching another YouTuber, and so on. The video's recursiveness 
> goes several steps deeper, until it reaches the promised land: the 
> Wausau home of a 24-year-old woman known as Nornna, top right.
>
>  Nornna's videos, which number in the hundreds, are hardly salacious. 
> Usually she is doing something completely commonplace: making a peanut 
> butter and jelly sandwich, powdering her feet, missing her bus, 
> watching television. Some videos of Nonna, shown above at top, have 
> been viewed more than 50,000 times. As her videos gained an audience, 
> her fans started posting videos of themselves watching Nornna, and the 
> momentum was unstoppable.

And of course it has come down to a contest of who has the strangest 
link chain...

> Of these, the most popular, and most discussed on YouTube's message 
> boards, is pizzelle2's "I Win at Nornna." Like Nornna, pizzelle2 
> wouldn't consent to an interview, but in the video, she declares 
> herself the winner because one video she watches includes Nornna 
> watching pizzelle2 watch Nornna. It is Nornna-watching gone full 
> circle.
>
>  There's no end to the possibilities. Why, someone might even post a 
> video of himself reading a newspaper article about recursive videos.

No matter what the original reason for your site, it is all "social" in 
the end!

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/16/arts/16carney.html

Enjoy!

Valdis

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