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Ann,

Let me give you a personal experience, which framed my
later teaching strategies and indeed provided the
basis for my professional degrees, a Masters in
English AND a Masters in Reading.

In my very first Freshman class in college we ALL were
reading the Iliad.  In the mid term, exam the teacher
asked what the metaphor "rosy fingered dawn" meant. 
Well, I could tell you the whole plot and I could
describe all the characters, but what on earth was
this "rosy fingered dawn" thing!

Now I was a fast reader and a good reader. When I
tried to slow down to take into account the style, the
metaphors, etc. I lost the thread of the content.  But
since I was a fast reader anyway, I read the material
twice. Once for content and then again for textual
analysis.  This is when I realized that reading for an
English Prof is different from other kinds of reading!

First of all students coming right out of high school
may not know about textual analysis, what it is or
even how to do it.

As you put together your resources, you might be
interested in the listing of handouts at
howtostudy.org
Here I have categorized resources by discipline areas,
including one for English.

http://www.howtostudy.org/resources_subject.php?id=9

Feel free to use these resources and have your
students write mini reviews of what works for them.  I
will post the reviews for other students to read.
Writers can be anonymous, if they wish. I read all
reviews and edit them as necessary, before posting. 
Students can add your or the instructor's email, so
they can see the student reviews as well.

Lucy MacDonald
http://www.howtostudy.org



--- "Fleshman, Ann" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Colleagues,
> 
> I have taught developmental reading for a long time,
> but have been
> charged by the English department to develop a
> reading course for
> English majors. Many English faculty members
> complain that students are
> not prepared to deal with the text they have to read
> in the major, but
> there is a wide range of ability in the students in
> the major. Many
> English majors are honors students (1200 and above
> on the SAT), but
> faculty say that even they are not analyzing text in
> as sophisticated
> manner as is needed. I am excited about the
> possibilities, but was
> wondering if anyone else has developed such a course
> and, if so, you
> might share some of your ideas for it. Maybe some of
> you who haven't
> done a course might have some ideas about what you
> would do if given the
> opportunity. I'd love to hear. I don't know whether
> others are
> interested in this topic or not, so you certainly
> can reply privately if
> that would be better.
> 
>  
> 
> Thanks!
> 
>  
> 
> Ann Fleshman
> 
> Director, Academic Skills Center
> 
> Senior Lecturer of English
> 
> Columbia College
> 
> Columbia, SC  29203
> 
>  
> 
> 
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Lucy Tribble MacDonald, M.A.,M.A.Faculty EmeritaChemeketa Community College4977 Brookmeade DRSarasota, [log in to unmask]

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To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
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To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]