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NSA has massive database of Americans' phone calls....it works for meth 
precursor buyers...CRIME network analysis

http://www.psconsultinginc.com/meth-dealers.html



James Steward

President/CEO
P&S Consulting Inc
812-235-4847
812-249-6156 cell
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www.psconsultinginc.com





From: Richard Rothenberg <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: Richard Rothenberg <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: NSA Data Mining
Date: Tue, 16 May 2006 16:24:08 -0400

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Wandering through a megadata base seems like an exercise in futility, but 
such data can be made relevant when combined with on-the-ground information. 
  Suppose you know of someone suspected of terrorist activity, say, Mr. X.  
If you have all possible telephone dyads for the past 5 years (and you need 
them all, or close thereto), you can get Mr. X's complete in-degree and 
out-degree.  Take those contacts, eliminate the dry cleaners, the escort 
service, Ticketron, but hopefully not guys that you know about from other 
on-the-ground work or other data bases.  Get all the first-degree in and out 
contacts of the people on Mr. X's list who look interesting.  Repeat steps 
one or two for as often as needed (no, the number is not 6).  This will 
produce a sociogram of considerable interest.  Back to ground: you go find 
out what some of the key players in the group (here's a job for betweenness) 
actually do.

This brings a multibillion size job back to a reasonable size (10s, or even 
100s), but the key point is that this requires real spying, real 
surveillance, people who speak foreign languages, and a willingness to 
forego technological seduction.  In fact, the government might even be 
correct that 99.999% of all communications would remain untouched.  Under 
current law, my guess would be that all this is illegal, unless one follows 
the available channels (eavesdropping after identifying a network of 
persons) or changes the law the permit the initial evaluation.  The real 
question is why they wouldn't want to make this legal.

Ah well, guess we'll just have to trust them.  Now there's this election 
coming up in November...

Rich Rothenberg

Steven Corman wrote:

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>
>BTW Valdis some caller the Diane Rheem Show on NPR yesterday was quoting
>you saying similar things.
>
>Here's the deal: I just can't believe they have played hanky-panky with
>the law (being charitable, there) and amassed this huge wad of data just
>to go on a complete fishing expedition.  It's more plausible that they
>have identified a pattern from looking at known cells that they think
>they have a good chance to detect.
>
>The critiques linked in the your message all assume that they are
>looking for a single person.  What if they are looking for small groups?
>We know from captured documents that cell members are (or were) trained
>to remain detached from the host society.  It's easy to imagine that
>manifesting itself in a strange pattern of phone calling: only or mostly
>within a small group, no calls to family, few calls in the same area
>code outside the group, and so on.
>
>That would surely describe some non-terrorists too, but throw in some
>other variables like age of the phone numbers, geographic areas where
>there have been known calls from the Bad Guys, some time-series
>techniques, and it does not seem far-fetched that you could get some
>useful leads.
>
>The legality of how they have done this is what worries me, but apart
>from that I have yet to be convinced that it couldn't work.
>
>Steve
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
>Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
>Sent: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 9:49 AM
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: [SOCNET] NSA Data Mining
>
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>
>Two good editorials on why data mining just phone links may not be 
>useful...
>
>http://jeffjonas.typepad.com/jeff_jonas/2006/05/the_six_degrees.html
>
>http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/16/opinion/16farley.html
>
>Valdis
>
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>_____________________________________________________________________
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>
>
>

--
Richard Rothenberg, MD
Professor, Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Disease
Emory University School of Medicine
Editor, Annals of Epidemiology
49 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive
Atlanta, GA 30303
T: 404-616-5606
F: 404-616-6847
E: [log in to unmask]


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