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Are they analyzing the phone _system_ (i.e., the physical static  
switching network) or a network induced from telephone calls?  The  
former is presumably several orders of magnitude smaller as a data set.

Joshua O'Madadhain

On 24 May 2006, at 14:43, Stanley Wasserman wrote:

> I know people who are analyzing not the US phone system, but
>    the phone system in Spain.
>
> It's already happening.... not with standard software, but with
>    software written in house.
>
> SW
>
>
> Quoting Joshua O'Madadhain <[log in to unmask]>:
>
>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>
>> On 24 May 2006, at 13:42, Barry Wellman wrote:
>>
>>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>>
>>> Story in GCN today estimates that AT&Ts database supplied to NSA was
>>> 312 terrabytes plus, when managed by ATT's Daytona software that
>>> managements its call detail record dbase.
>>>
>>> Story recounts different opinions as to whether this is  
>>> analyzable  in any
>>> useful size. Supposedly SGI has computers with 13 terabytes worth of
>>> activity memory.
>>>
>>> Interested? Read the story at:
>>> http://www.gcn.com/print/25_13/40827-1.html
>>>
>>> I am waiting for the first paper that does clustering and   
>>> centrality on
>>> the American telephone system.
>>
>> I don't know if you were serious or not, but I don't expect to see
>> this soon, for a few reasons:
>>
>> (1) even the permanent storage (almost an exabyte, including data
>> from all 3 carriers) for
>> this data would be hard to manage, never mind getting it into memory
>> for analysis.
>>
>> (2) more importantly, this data hasn't--as far as I know--been
>> released to anyone that would be likely to publish analyses in an
>> open (i.e., unclassified) journal.  Nor do I expect that it will soon
>>  be released for such a purpose.
>>
>> As a final point, since the network changes over time (people move
>> and acquire new phone numbers, old phone numbers are recycled, people
>>  acquire new "phone relationships" and discard old ones, etc.), the
>> definition of "the network" for purposes of clustering/centrality
>> analyses would be open to interpretation.  (Looking at extremely
>> small time slices of the network would be one way of dealing with the
>>  storage and memory problem, though.)
>>
>> Joshua O'Madadhain
>>
>> jmadden@ics.uci.edu...Obscurium Per Obscurius...www.ics.uci.edu/ 
>> ~jmadden
>> Joshua O'Madadhain: Information Scientist, Musician, and  
>> Philosopher- At-Tall
>>   It's that moment of dawning comprehension that I live for--Bill   
>> Watterson
>>   My opinions are too rational and insightful to be those of any
>> organization.
>>
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>
>

jmadden@ics.uci.edu...Obscurium Per Obscurius...www.ics.uci.edu/~jmadden
Joshua O'Madadhain: Information Scientist, Musician, and Philosopher- 
At-Tall
   It's that moment of dawning comprehension that I live for--Bill  
Watterson
   My opinions are too rational and insightful to be those of any  
organization.

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
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