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Our SI program has been struggling to survive.  Our students simply do
not schedule enough time between classes or remain on campus long enough
to receive the academic assistance that is offered.  The students, for
the most part, at SCC are very transient; they attend class and run to
the parking lot to get to work, get the kids from school, etc. 

The SI Leader must be a student who has successfully completed the
course and has received SI training.  The SI Leader sits in the course
to act as a model student.  The three to five scheduled, weekly 50
minute sessions are to be attended by the students in that course.  The
relationship of the enrolled students and the SI Leader is peer led
academic assistance.  The scheduled sessions are for that instructor's
students.

The SI program at the community college will take time to cultivate. 
The mind set of the faculty and students must be changed to realize that
SI is another resource for academic success.  The record keeping:
signing-in, grade analysis, etc. is to show that the program really
works when students attend.  The national track record shows students
who attend a certain number of SI sessions will earn a letter grade
higher than students who never attend.  The more sessions attended, the
higher the grade. (in most cases)

My associates at the University of Central Florida do not have this
problem with SI.  Sessions are scheduled in the dorms, etc. and students
are on campus.

Talk with SI officials in Kansas and see if there are alternatives to
try for the community college audience.  We serve a very different and
diverse population.  Community college students have to realize that
they must spend some quality time on campus because usually once they
leave, very little time is given to  school work.

Marylen M. Jennings, Coordinator
Academic Success Center
Seminole Community College
100 Weldon Blvd
Sanford, FL 32773
407-708-2385
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>>> [log in to unmask] 7/13/2006 12:13 PM >>>
I do not have literature to provide you, but it is our policy that the
SI Leader not grade tests or homework ore even facilitate tests on
behalf of the instructor. The SI Leader should be very clearly
separate
from instruction. Our SI Leaders are students who have successfully
completed a course with an A or a B and have been endorsed by an
instructor for that course. It has been very effective to have SI
Leaders be peers. The SI Leader needs to be someone students are able
to
go to comfortably to ask questions and get help while they may not be
comfortable to do the same with the instructor. It would be very
inappropriate and ineffective for the SI Leader (tutor) to be aware of
student's grades without the student's consent or voluntary
disclosure.
To preserve the SI - student relationship I recommend against it. 

For useful information on starting an SI program, CRLA is highly
recommended: http://www.crla.net/.
  

Karey A. Pharris
Learning Services Coordinator 
Student Support Services
Pikes Peak Community College

 "The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of
today" - Franklin D. Roosevelt



 

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of [log in to unmask] 
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2006 8:53 AM
To: [log in to unmask] 
Subject: question about SI

Colleagues,

I have been trying to get an SI program started here for several
years,
without much success. I now have a professor who is willing to give it
a
try and a prospective SI leader. The question I have is that the
professor
has asked the leader to grade tests and homework. My first instinct is
that
this should not be a part of the SI relationship, although I have no
concrete data to back this up. The SI leader said he is willing to
grade
on
his own time, but I am still not sure that this is a sound pedagogical
move. I need to tap into your collective wisdom on this. Any
references
to
SI literature would be very helpful here, as I reviewed all of the
info
I
have and have not come up with an answer to this question, or those
below:
What are the pros and cons of having an SI leader grade homework and
tests?
Can you share your experiences w/ starting an SI program?
The professor thinks he is getting a TA at no cost to his department.
What
are the similarities and differences between an SI leader and a TA?

Thanks,
Roberta Schotka
NADE'08 conference co-chair
Head, Peer Tutoring
Northeastern University Libraries, 242 SL
(617) 373-2150 voice
(617) 373-2529 fax
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