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Richard,
     Just an echo of Lynn's response.  I tried for a decade to get NSF to
fund just the GSS question on core networks, and finally Lynn and I got
the money in 2002.  It would be nice to have data on more subtle and
weaker ties, but just the core stuff costs over 250K, which strains
sociology's NSF program budget.  One reason that I decided to title the
ASR paper so aggressively ("Social Isolation in America") was to try to
get some notice into the public consciousness that social networks are
studied by people other than the computer scientists and physicists.
     So, I guess what I'm doing here is to take full responsibility for
the "damage" caused by our research (cf. discussion on this list) due to
the title.  I hope that the caution expressed in the paper itself stands
up to scientific scrutiny.  And if not, I hope that the increased
attention will allow somebody else to find it out quickly and
productively.  There are some signs already that social scientists are
getting a little more of the attention that they deserve for these
ideas...

Unapologetically funded,
Miller McPherson

On Thu, 27 Jul 2006, Richard Larson wrote:

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>
> In my research at MIT, I need to find a credible histogram of the
> frequency of human (face to face) daily contacts for a representative
> sample of the USA.  Example:  10 % of the population interact with 5
> or fewer people per day.  5% interact with over 100.  etc.  An
> 'interaction' can be a transaction with a sales clerk, selling a
> subway token,  having breakfast with your spouse, meeting with a
> student, etc.
>
> While I have explored social network literature, I can't seem to find
> something this simple and yet fundamental.  Are you aware of such
> data?
>
> Thanks for your help!
>
> --Dick Larson
>
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********************************        *
Miller McPherson                     *  *
Professor of Sociology               ******
University of Arizona                   *
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