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Breslau, Daniel, "Sociology after Humanism: A Lesson from Contemporary Science Studies." Sociological Theory 18(2):289-307, 2000.Breslau, Daniel, "Sociology after Humanism: A Lesson from Contemporary Science Studies." Sociological Theory 18(2):289-307, 2000.Breslau, Daniel, "Sociology after Humanism: A Lesson from Contemporary Science Studies." Sociological Theory 18(2):289-307, 2000.Breslau, Daniel, "Sociology after Humanism: A Lesson from Contemporary Science Studies." Sociological Theory 18(2):289-307, 2000.Dear Ryan: 
1. ACT uses the idea of "relational ontology" or "networks" to prevent us from structural analysis, while SNA uses network models precisely for that.  See Breslau, Daniel, "Sociology after Humanism: A Lesson from Contemporary Science Studies." Sociological Theory 18(2):289-307, 2000.

2. The relative impact of NGO, linguistic relational patterns, etc.  can be modeled and tested.  Notwithanding reification, and while states are also arena, theatres, contrived institutions and the like, I think that they are also at least for some purposes (such as waging a war) actors in themselves. 

3.  If the EC is a "real" entity, relations and indirectly relational patterns should uncover it as a block. 



 

Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
Senior Lecturer
Department of Sociology and Anthropology,\
University of Haifa
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----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Valdis Krebs" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2006 6:03 PM
Subject: Re: Mideast Network Map


> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> 
> Good feedback Ryan, Diana.
> 
> The problem with models is always what to include and what to leave 
> out.  You want to make them easy enough to understand and use [by more 
> people than the designer].  Yet, you do not want to make them too easy, 
> so they lose all touch with reality or the client/analyst says "so 
> what".
> 
> In my 20+ of business experience in building many models, mostly of a 
> network nature [not talking about financial models], I have found that 
> on the continuum from toy model to "everything + 2 back up systems" 
> there is a sweet spot, about a 1/3 of the way down from the easy end 
> where you can teach/learn some complex concepts with a sufficiently 
> robust model, that still retains simplicity.  My experience in pushing 
> down that continuum toward the high end is that it brings less and less 
> return for time invested.  Of course I am a practitioner and this may 
> not be a good rule of thumb in academia.
> 
> Yes, if I was doing this for a client I would break up the EU node into 
> constituent pieces -- at least show those countries that have 
> significant military/economic ties with any of the Mideast countries.  
> Also, breaking up the positive ties into two networks/sets would also 
> be prudent -- 1)economic, 2) military.  Even these two distinctions 
> could be easily divided further.  But for now, I just want to start 
> learning how negative ties may affect an interconnected system of 
> players.
> 
> Valdis
> 
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