Print

Print


Hi, Jennifer,

We have had success with the following processes...
*  Ask for some time to address division meetings to introduce yourself
and to explain the services you offer.

*  Have a clearly outlined process and include a feedback form to send
faculty that the tutor/writing specialist completes following each
tutorial session.

* Offer a "Faculty Forum" that includes you, your tutors, instructors
who teach writing across the curriculum, English faculty, and part-time
instructors.  During our first forum we had the Humanities division
chair and the coordinator of the English department participate, a
faculty member from our ESL program attend and a couple of PT
instructors (English and speech).  We identified strengths and
challenges, then we brainstormed solutions.

*  As for class visits, we send a letter to all English instructor and
now we include WAC instructors with class visit time listed that include
some options.  We actually tell them we are coming for a quick
presentations and that they can select a date that works best for them.

*  We offer workshops to students about time management, note-taking,
basic grammar review, outlining, whatever is needed.  We even conduct
workshops in the classrooms that are designed to the needs of the
instructor.

*  Include information about your services in student orientations - a
presentation and/or flyers about services.

Regards,


Zola K. Gordy, Retention Coordinator
Teaching/Learning Center
MCC - Penn Valley 
3201 Southwest Trafficway
Kansas City, MO 64111
(816) 759-4004
[log in to unmask]

What better book can there be than the book of humanity?
--Cesar Chavez

>>> "Ambrose, Jennifer" <[log in to unmask]> 10/16/2006 11:37 am
>>>
Hello--

I am about a month into my new job as "Campus Writing Specialist." I
work out of our Study Center and am classified as academic staff. One
of
my duties is to "market" writing tutoring services to faculty and
students, so that more students come for writing tutoring and I can
make
valuable use of my time. We do not want to focus solely on the English
department.

Specifically, my boss would like me to try to foster relationships
with
faculty so that they will invite me into their classes to assist with
peer review, or teach a lesson concerning MLA or grammar, for example.


I would love advice about how to approach faculty from those of you
who
have done something similar to what I am being asked to do, and from
full-time faculty on this list who have been solicited for their help
in
promoting certain services your institution offers. 

So far, I have sent out a mass introductory letter about myself and my
services which has resulted in one invitation from a Biology professor
to assist in peer review, and I have just written up a mass follow up
letter to remind people about my services as Mid-terms approach. 

It seems like it would be helpful to call and email professors
individually and ask to come talk to them about what services I can
provide. But if they make it clear they are uninterested, do I just
leave it at that? What more can I do if a professor makes it clear
that
they know about my services and that they will contact me if needed,
like one already has? 

Any ideas? Resources? 

Thank you, for your time

Jennifer Ambrose
UW-Waukesha Campus Writing Specialist
Writing Tutor Coordinator
262-521-5549

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html 

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]