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I personally feel that the definition that Indiana University uses is an
excellent one and covers all bases, so I have copied it below from their
website at http://www.indiana.edu/~istd/definition.html
You will notice that there is no distinction made between plagiarizing
from a printed paper or from the internet.  Whatever form the original
work is in, if a student takes credit for work that someone else did, or
takes ideas from work done by another without acknowledging the source
of the ideas, from my point of view, this is plagiarism.

3. Plagiarism. 

Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone else's work, including the
work of other students, as one's own. Any ideas or materials taken from
another source for either written or oral use must be fully
acknowledged, unless the information is common knowledge. What is
considered "common knowledge" may differ from course to course.

a. A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories,
formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without
acknowledgment.

b. A student must give credit to the originality of others and
acknowledge an indebtedness whenever:

1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or
written;

2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;

3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others,
whether oral or written;

4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or

5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of
projects or collections without acknowledgment.

 

You might want to visit the following IU websites for more about
plagiarism.

 

http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml


 

http://www.indiana.edu/~istd/

 

This email message dictated to a Dragon in training
I am training Dragon NaturallySpeaking.  Please forgive minor, odd
errors and anomalies.
 
Elizabeth Worden, Director
Academic Support Center
Eastern Maine Community College
354 Hogan Road
Bangor, ME  04401
phone:  207 974 4658
fax:  207 974 4888
website:  www.emcc.edu/departments/asc/
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lisa Burns
Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 8:44 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: avoiding plaigarism

Dear Colleagues,
 
I am currently looking for ideas and activities to help introduce the
concept of citation and avoiding plagarism for our growing exchange
program
with China.  It has been brought to my attention that the idea of
intellectual property is a Western notion and that plagarism is not
taboo in
China as it is in the States.
 
Does anyone have any suggestions or current practices/activites that
they
have found helpful when working with ESL students?  Your suggestions
would
be greatly appreciated.  Thank you.
 
Lisa Burns, x2393
Tutor Coordinator
155 Greenwood Library
Longwood University
 

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