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Dear Socnetters,

Barabási (2002; Baran, 1964) introduces three basic topologies for networks;
centralized, distributed and decentralized. I'm looking for references that
describe the structures of these three basic types from macro-perspective
(not from the ego's point of view). How these networks differ from each
other when described with the very basic network measures (centrality,
betweennes etc.)? Which network measures suit the best to describe the
structures of these three networks?

The reason why I'm asking is that I have a small (n=89) socio-metric dataset
where people working in the organization have rated the frequency of
communication with every people in the same firm from three perspectives
(routine work, development work and ideas). The hypotheses I have come up so
far are:
1) Described with network measures, the network of information flow related
to routine work tasks is likely to resemble centralized network structure.
2) Described with network measures, the network of information flow related
to development work is likely to resemble distributed network structure.
3) Described with network measures, the network of information flow related
to ideas is likely to resemble decentralized network structure.

I decided to look at the data from socio-centric perspective first. I have
not made any ego-centric hypotheses yet (although that would be interesting
too, are the same individuals central in routine work and ideas and why/why
not, for example). I have a conference paper about these socio-centric
hypotheses that I can send in case someone is interested.

Best regards,

Anssi Smedlund
Researcher
Helsinki University of Technology
Finland
Visiting Student Researcher, 2006
University of California, Berkeley, IMIO
F402 Haas School of Business #1930
Berkeley, CA 94720-1930
Tel: (510)643-5316
Fax: (510)642-2826
Cell: (510)374-8556
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