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a prime example of the application of network motifs to the analysis of 
networks in an organizational setting is:

Lomi, A., P. Pattison. 2006. Manufacturing Relations: An Empirical Study 
of the Organization of Production Across Multiple Networks. Organization 
Science, 17(3): 313-332.

Abstract: Organizational communities present two generic features that 
are recurrently documented in empirical studies, but only imperfectly 
accounted for in current models of interorganizational relations. The 
first is the tendency of participant organizations to construct observed 
macrostructure locally, through relational activities that involve only 
a small subset of possible network ties. The second is the tendency for 
different types of ties to overlap, concatenate, and induce a variety of 
local structures—or relational motifs—across network domains. A critical 
task in the analysis of organizational communities is to specify 
appropriate local dependence structures across multiple networks, 
starting from detailed observation of dyadic interaction among 
participants. In this paper we illustrate one way in which this 
analytical task might be accomplished in the context of a study of 
interorganizational networks. We use data that we have collected on 
different types of relationships among 106 organizations, located in 
Southern Italy, involved in the production of means of transportation to 
test hypotheses about patterns of local network ties and paths across 
multiple networks. Our empirical analysis is guided by the general claim 
that the formation of network ties is subject to endogenous and 
exogenous processes. We specify statistical models for random graphs 
that allow us to examine this claim, and to formulate and test specific 
hypotheses about the form that such network-based processes might take. 
The results that we report provide clear empirical support for the 
relational motifs implied by our hypotheses. We also find strong 
empirical support for the proposition that interorganizational 
dependencies extend across multiple networks.

Key words: interorganizational networks; p-star models; network motifs; 
resource dependence

fabio

> Date:    Mon, 9 Oct 2006 22:38:43 -0400
> From:    "Paul B. Hartzog" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Network Motifs
> 
> Has anyone used 'network motifs' in social networks? A la
> Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks
> R. Milo, S. Shen-Orr, S. Itzkovitz, N. Kashtan, D. Chklovskii, U. Alon
> 25 OCTOBER 2002 VOL 298 SCIENCE
>
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 10 Oct 2006 13:18:24 +1000
> From:    Garry Robins <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Fwd: Network Motifs
> 
> Yes - except they may not be called "motifs". Examples:
> 
> 	Start with the work of Moreno and Jennings in the 1930s and 1940s on "social configurations"
> 
> 	The dyad census (and the related p1 model of Holland and Leinhardt, 1981)
> 
> 	The triad census of Holland and Leinhardt, and Davis and Leinhardt, in the 1970s
> 
> 	Then try all the p* or exponential random graph model work, starting with Frank and Strauss (1986)
> 
> 	including configurations (or "motifs") involving multiple networks (Pattison and Wasserman, 1999), also involving actor attributes,
> 
> 	and the new specifications for these models by Snijders et al,  shortly to come out in Sociological Methodology
> 
> It's a very long tradition, going back way before Science 2002.
> Garry Robins
>
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-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Fabio Fonti
Assistant Professor - Boston College
The W.E. Carroll School of Management - Organization Studies Dept.
432 Fulton Hall - 140 Commonwealth Ave. - Chestnut Hill, MA 02467

617-552-6822 (voice) - 617-552-4230 (fax) - [log in to unmask]

'What's hard is to be as simple as Bach ... Making the simple 
complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely 
simple, that's creativity.'

						Charlie Mingus

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