Print

Print


Thanks for your replies.  Although I realized that the FUSE I was trying 
to use was not the same thing as Filesystem in Userspace, it turns out 
that both applications were installed (which I did not know) making 
things very confusing.  The module that wasn't loading was the 
Filesystem in Userspace module, which I don't necessarily need to work.  
I was testing the Nallatech drivers with an executable they provide, and 
it was returning "Segmentation Fault", which on top of receiving module 
load messages led me to believe it was an issue with the drivers.  
However as it turns out you must run that executable as root (oddly 
enough!) in order for it to not Seg Fault.

Thanks for the assistance though!

~Mark Oden

Jon Akers wrote:
> Mark Oden wrote:
>> I'm having an issue with loading a proprietary module on a machine in 
>> my research lab.  We have Nallatech FPGA boards which are peripherals 
>> that attach to the PCI bus.  In the perfect world, you just install 
>> their "fuse" rpms (not the same thing as Filesystem in Userspace) and 
>> their "h100" rpms and life is good.  However, using rpmbuild, I 
>> patched the kernel with perfctr, which broke the Nallatech drivers so 
>> I had to re-install the rpms (first using rpm -e, then rpm -ivh).  
>> Unfortunately on reboot (or modprobe fuse) I receive the following 
>> error:
>>
>> Fatal: Error inserting fuse 
>> (/lib/modules/2.6.9-22.ELsmp/kernel/fs/fuse/fuse.ko) : Invalid module 
>> format.
>>
>> if booting, I also receive:
>>
>> Cannot access /dev/fuse No such file or directory
>>
>> I highly suspect these issues are due to patching perfctr.  If anyone 
>> has any ideas on how to allow both perfctr and fuse to operate 
>> side-by-side or need any further information please let me know.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> ~Mark Oden
>
> What kind of output do you get when you do a modprobe -v?
>
> Also, you might want to do a modprobe --show-depends on the module to 
> see what kind of dependencies it had. Note that this may provide an 
> empty list, which is possibly alright.
>
> Another thing you can do is a modinfo on the module to see what is 
> known about it.
>