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Unfortunately, I don't see it here:

http://www.opensource.org/licenses/alphabetical

Wonder what keeps it from officially being open source as it does  
look pretty permissive indeed?

-- 
Jordan Wiens, CISSP
UF Network Security Engineer
(352)392-2061

On May 1, 2007, at 9:12 AM, Eric Lavigne wrote:

> http://blogs.msdn.com/hugunin/archive/2007/04/30/a-dynamic-language- 
> runtime-dlr.aspx
>
> http://tirania.org/blog/
>
> Microsoft is open sourcing some very nice pieces of technology. They
> have reimplemented Ruby, Python, Javascript, and OCaml as .NET
> languages. They have released their new dynamic language runtime
> (DLR), a sandboxing runtime called Silverlight, as well as the first
> two of those four languages, under the Microsoft Permissive License,
> which seems like a very open license. OCaml is provided free as in
> beer, but under a more restrictive license that might keep it out of
> Linux distros.
>
> Here is the Microsoft Permissive License. It is a short license that
> doesn't seem to have any weird strings attached.
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/sharedsource/licensingbasics/ 
> permissivelicense.mspx
>
> This is a very significant gift to the open source community, and I
> don't see any indication of Trojans hiding inside.
>