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Japan's public broadcaster NHK reported late last week that the
Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry plans to introduce
the open-source operating system Linux for use within classrooms
across the country in the near future.

http://gyaku.jp/en/index.php?cmd=contentview&pid=000112

The move toward open-source software within Japan mirrors similar
transformations ongoing within educational institutions in numerous
other countries around the world. An article late last month in
Linux.com reported that "Linux and open source software are receiving
increased interest within the educational sector as an alternative to
Microsoft Windows Vista," noting that the British Educational
Communications and Technology Agency (Becta), among others, warned of
"lock-in" risks due to Microsoft's licensing programs. In Venezuela,
the government has gone so far as to make it illegal  by issue of a
Presidential Decree  to use proprietary software in public
educational institutions, giving rise to several open-source movements
[7]. Meanwhile, Chinese government officials reportedly now regard the
open-source community as "a key to its software industry" and plans to
invest more resources in Linux-based systems [8].