Print

Print


If passing algebra actually means acquiring the numeracy knowledge, then
I would say "make everybody pass algebra."  

Sometimes it does, and sometimes it doesn't.

I agree that starting somewhere in preschool we've really dumbed things
down.  I also agree that people should learn to Do Hard Things.  

HOwever, many of my students don't learn to Do Hard Things - they
simply learn to fail and drop out, which actually teaches a nastier
lesson - don't even bother to *try* doing hard things. 

Given the current state of the country, there should be options for
postsecondary education without math, but we're hurting so many people
who *could* benefit from learning it. 

IT's one of those hot buttons again :)  



Susan Jones
Academic Development Specialist
Academic Development Center
Parkland College
Champaign, IL  61821
[log in to unmask]
Webmastress,
http://www.resourceroom.net
http://bicyclecu.blogspot.com


>>> Laura Symons <[log in to unmask]> 1/8/2007 12:03 PM >>>
Kathryn's response was so cool! Now here's a rationale for taking any
course in the curriculum:

In a world where change is the only constant, the one true survival
skill is the ability to adjust and adapt to the needs of the moment. 
That skill requires flexibility of point of view and the ability to
apply different kinds of thinking in different situations.  College
courses provide a rich array of different ways of thinking.
Mathematicians approach the world very differently than anthropologists,
than historians, than artists, than writers and the list goes on through
the entire curriculum. Why take courses in subjects that are difficult?
To create new skills you probably would not go after on your own. To
learn more about yourself. To do something you don't like to do. To
learn to deal with fear, frustration, and may even anger in a relatively
low stakes setting. 

Happy New Year, all!

Laura

Laura Symons

Coordinator of the Learning Center
Piedmont  Virginia Community College
501 College Drive
Charlottesville, VA 22902-7589

434 961 5310
 
*The people who believe that something can't be done should get out of
the way of the person doing it.*

Chinese Proverb

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Kathryn VanWagoner
Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 12:11 PM
To: [log in to unmask] 
Subject: Re: Math for Liberal Arts Majors

I am a math teacher and I'm split on the curriculum issue.  But I have
to respond to those (not just Kathy) who say "I've never used algebra."

My response is:  of course not, you don't know it.  If you know
algebra
you can use it.

I spent a number of years as an at-home mom and used algebra many
times
(and not just when I was substitute teaching).  Some examples: I
helped
a neighbor figure out how much real whole milk to mix with powdered
non-fat milk to come up with 2% milk that her family would drink (a
mixture problem).  I used permutations when planning the seating
arrangements for a church dinner. I helped a business owner calculate
profits for inventory for which he was missing purchase records. I
frequently handle landscape related questions -- still.  Sure, lots of
people get along without algebra, but just because you don't use it,
doesn't mean it isn't useful.

This common argument against algebra can be used for most general
education subjects.  I can honestly say I have never diagramed a
sentence in real life.  Nor have I had to analyze poetry.  I've never
found a great need for critiquing art or music.  I've gotten along
quite
well in life without a solid understanding of photosynthesis or the
parts of a cell or how a star is born or methods of archeological
digging.  In fact, looking back, I think the most useful general
education class I took was aerobics -- and skiing.

We've developed a culture where being bad at math is socially
acceptable.  We should be trying to change that paradigm, not nurture
it.  I have a child who has writing anxiety that rivals any math
anxiety
that I've seen.  Should he be encouraged in his anxiety?  Or should he
be taught skills to overcome it?  

The "math problem" is very complex and will not be simply solved by a
change in curriculum.



Kathryn Van Wagoner
Math Lab Manager
Utah Valley State College
801-863-8411

ad-van-tage   n.  A factor conducive to success.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html 

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask] 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html 

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]