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There's a new "Becoming a Master Student Athlete" version. 

Dr. Joanne Conlon
Director, Student Academic Support
106 Brown Science
Rosemont College
1400 Montgomery Ave.
Rosemont, PA 19010
(610) 527-0200  x2366
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-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Robert Ciervo
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 12:53 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Athletes and Study Skills

Kate:
I used to direct the academic support program for student-athletes at Temple
University in Philadelphia.

A great resource you may want to investigate is the book "A
Student-Athlete's Guide to College Success" written by Trent Petrie and Eric
Denson. I have the 1999 edition.  I would also recommend other texts such as
Becoming a Master Student by Ellis and Self-Management for College Students
by O'Keefe and Berger.

I used to use a mixture of all three in my work with student-athletes. What
is important is to treat the student-athletes like students first and
foremost.  In reality their experiences are very similar to students who
also work a full-time job and we all know many more are trying to do this.

Rob


Robert L. Ciervo, Ph.D., Director
Rutgers-Camden Learning Center
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey-Camden
231 Armitage Hall
311 N. Fifth Street
Camden, NJ 08102
(856) 225-2722
(856) 225-6443 fax
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-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Kate Jakobson
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 12:27 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Athletes and Study Skills

Hello All:

 

I've just had 6-7 basketball players on academic probation placed into my
developmental level study skills class for this semester.  Last minute but
it's a new AD and his new tough academic policies, which I do support
wholeheartedly.   Not all of the b'ball players are at the developmental
level, although none of them are doing that well and a couple are right on
the edge of being out.  At the moment there is only one actual DEV student
in the class (a 40 yr. old woman reading at the 4th grade level with 6
b'ball players.oy. )  

 

While I've taught the usual study skills and have a brand-new student
success/fresh.exp. course beginning next fall, I've not really had any
experience with athletes.  Since this is a make or break semester for all of
them (no scholarship next year if grades aren't improved), I would *imagine*
they'd attempt to do their best, but what do I know.  I do know there's been
considerable attention paid lately to athletics and academics, many articles
that I've read, and several publishers have materials and texts out there,
but the class starts next week.

 

I was hoping that some of you might have advice, suggestions, or ideas that
I might implement that would grab their attention and keep it, and hopefully
make the class worthwhile enough for them to take it seriously.

 

Any advice?  And thank you all in advance.

 

Kate

Kate Jakobson, Director

Tutoring and Student Success

Kirtland Community College

989.275.5000 x 211

 


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