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Hmmm. Well, this is a bit of an over-simplification, isn't it? I do
recognize that the piece is supposed to be humorous but the little
racist bit at the end kills the humor for me. So . . .  no response,
really.  

 

Instead, allow me to give you all some samples of Math I Have Never and
Will Never Use in My Life and Which Would Not Be Beneficial to Many
Liberal Arts Students in Many Liberal Arts Majors in My Personal and
Obviously Mathematically 'Rube-ified' Opinion: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are just a few samples from a mathematics placement test I have on
my computer. There are others, such as, 

 

 

 

 

and  

 

 

 

and

 

 

 

that I can see the practical application of in my daily life and in my
particular field (and, back in the day, in my college majors).  And
there are lots of others, but I agree with whoever said this topic has
become a dead horse. I guess the entire list is just going to have to
agree to disagree with me. - Kathy 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of [log in to unmask]
Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 3:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Math for Liberal Arts Majors

 

Perhaps fortuitously, a colleague of mine and a Cal Tech graduate, this 

morning sent me the following  email that might relate, if only
tangentially, to 

the ongoing math/algebra thread.

 

Happy New Year Anyway.

Gene Kerstiens

Andragogy Associates

(310) 326-5819

www.sbi4windows.com

 

Subject: THE NEW MATH

 

   Last week I purchased a burger at McDonnell's for $3.58

      The counter girl took my $4.00 and I pulled 8

 cents from my pocket and gave it to her. She stood

 there, holding the nickel and 3 pennies. While

 looking at the screen on her register, I sensed her

 discomfort and tried to tell her to just give me two

 quarters, but she hailed the manager for help. While

 he tried to explain the transaction to her, she

 stood there and cried. Why do I tell you this? 

 

      

 

   Because of the evolution in teaching math since

 the 1950s...... 

 

       Teaching Math In 1950

  A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His

cost of production is 4/5 of the price. What is his

profit? 

 

      

 

   Teaching Math In 1960

   A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His

 cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80. What

 is his profit? 

 

      

 

   Teaching Math In 1970

   A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His

 cost of production is $80. Did he make a profit? 

 

      

 

   Teaching Math In 1980

   A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His

 cost of production is $80 and his profit is $20 Your

 assignment: Underline the number 20. 

 

      

 

   Teaching Math In 1990

   A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he

 is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for

 the habitat of animals or the preservation of our

 woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of

 $20. What do you think of this way of making a

 living? Topic for class participation after

 answering the question: How did the birds and

 squirrels feel as the logger cut down their homes?

 (There are no wrong answers.) 

 

      

 

 

   Teaching Math In 2006

   Un ranchero vende una carretera de maderapara

 $100. El cuesto de la produccion era $80. Cuantos

 tortillas se puede comprar?

 

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