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Don,
Thanks for your interesting response.  The White examples of Mardi Gras and
chess tournament well illustrate the impact of relaxed or powerful social
rules, with total definition of range of choice in the chess game.  What
does he mean by "ambiguity" being necessarily high in the chess game?   Is
he talking about ambiguity of actor motive, or ambiguity of strategic
implication of a given chess move, or what?  What do the concepts of local
action and robust action mean and why are they relevant here?
Thanks
Jeff     

Jeffrey Broadbent
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology
Institute for Global Studies
909 Social Science Building
University of Minnesota
267  19th  Ave. S.
Minneapolis, Minnesota
USA 55455
Telephone: 1-612-624-1828
Main Office Fax: 1-612-624-7020
E-mail: [log in to unmask]
Webpage: http://www.soc.umn.edu/faculty/Broadbent.htm

-----Original Message-----
From: Don Steiny [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
Sent: Saturday, January 06, 2007 12:51 PM
To: Jeffrey Broadbent
Cc: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Networks and conformity

Jeffrey,

	You might want to check out: ambage and ambiguity in Identity and
Control by Harrison White.  He gives examples of two ends of a spectrum
with on end being Mardi Gras and the other being a chess tournament.
The the first case, the social rules are suspended, so individual action
is less constrained by social rules so there is less ambiguity necessary
in the action At the other end the social rules are highly constraining
so there is more ambiguity necessary in the action. This is predicated
on being familiar with Leifer's "local action" or Padgett's "robust
action."

-Don
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> 
> Loet and Ryan are commenting with admirable succinctness. :)
> 
> How about this: Any relationship between two "units," from a tension to a
> friendship, can be considered a "vector."  Whatever the content
(relational
> modality)of the vector, its degree of control over the actions of the
units
> is a variable.  The value of the variable runs from highly cohesive
> (sticky--allowing no agency by the units) to highly "friable"
> (crumbly--allowing much agency by the units).  If we think of it this way,
> we can compare networks on their degree of cohesiveness.  
> 
> 
> Jeffrey Broadbent
> Associate Professor
> Department of Sociology
> Institute for Global Studies
> 909 Social Science Building
> University of Minnesota
> 267  19th  Ave. S.
> Minneapolis, Minnesota
> USA 55455
> Telephone: 1-612-624-1828
> Main Office Fax: 1-612-624-7020
> E-mail: [log in to unmask]
> Webpage: http://www.soc.umn.edu/faculty/Broadbent.htm
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Ryan Lanham
> Sent: Saturday, January 06, 2007 9:18 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Networks and conformity
> 
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> 
> Loet:
> 
>>> Eisenberg and Goodall (2004) suggest that is perhaps an 
>>> unresolvable tension ...
> 
>> The tension remains unresolvable if one does not specify the mechanisms.
>> Indeed, the mechanisms at the level of society generate uncertainty with
>> which the individual has to cope. Social network analysis provides us
with
>> statics or at best comparative statics, but not with the specification of
>> the dynamics.
> 
> Ryan:
> 
> What is the difference between a tension and a social network?  Could one
> use SNA to model "tensions"?  What is the difference between a
relationship
> and a tension?
> 
> Ryan Lanham  
> 
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