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  Hi ,
 
 I've just completed a study for my PhD in which participants in the online virtual world Second Life rated their friends more highly on a series of social psychological attributes (e.g., trust, credibility, social comparison) the more "private" the reported communication they engaged in (based upon public chat in the Second Life space, one-to-one Instant Message chat in Second Life, and (unspecified) outside Second Life chat). The results also support Caroline Haythornthwaite's, Barry Wellman's and Laura Garton's research on "media multiplexity". However, I don't have any comparative data for these results with offline networks (e.g., telephone contact, or contact in different "meatspace" contexts like clubs etc). I'm drawing instead from the virtual community research which argues a link between online and offline identity.
 
 Aleks
 http://www.surrey.ac.uk/~psp1ak
  

Caroline Haythornthwaite <[log in to unmask]> wrote: *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Re: If X and Y have a strong tie on-line it can be predicted that they have a strong tie overall???  Anyone have + or - 
research on that?

The studies Barry Wellman and I have done (togehter and separately) show a 'media multiplexity' effect -- that 
communication occurs through more media the closer the interpersonal tie. This is from reports of media use which 
allows comparable data across various means of communication, but, of course, probably does not match objective 
use. Predictively, I'd say if the communication happened through a lot of media, including various kinds of online 
communication, then it's likely to be a stronger tie, particularly if communication is frequent. (Strong work/
friendship ties rather than kin ties.) Among online learners, ties that included more than the class-mandated media 
were found to be stronger than those just maintained through the class media.

Some papers ...

Haythornthwaite, C. & Wellman, B. (1998). Work, friendship and media use for information exchange in a networked 
organization. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 49(12), 1101-1114.

Haythornthwaite, C. (2000). Online personal networks: Size, composition and media use among distance learners. 
New Media and Society, 2(2), 195-226.

Haythornthwaite, C. (2002). Strong, weak and latent ties and the impact of new media. The Information Society, 18
(5), 385 - 401.

/Caroline
 



---- Original message ----
>Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2007 16:24:14 -0500
>From: Valdis Krebs   
>Subject: Re: Opinion Leading in Online Communities  
>To: [log in to unmask]
>
>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
>Yeah good points... always struggling with questions like that in  
>consulting gigs also... other $64K question is where do you draw the  
>border?!
>
>I am hoping the on-line researchers pipe up... I'm sure I saw  
>something on on SOCNET a while back...
>
>Valdis
>
>
>On Jan 15, 2007, at 4:10 PM, Joshua O'Madadhain wrote:
>
>> Valdis:
>>
>> What you suggest is an interesting direction for research...but not
>> very well formulated, because "strong tie overall" is not
>> well-defined.  In order to investigate it, you'd have to figure out
>> what you meant by that phrase.  (Preferably, of course, in a
>> non-ad-hoc manner; it's very easy to come up with a definition like "A
>> and B have a strong tie overall if they are tied in k out of n
>> networks", but that just begs the question (among others) of how you
>> pick k in a principled fashion.)
>>
>> Joshua
>>
>> On 1/15/07, Valdis Krebs  wrote:
>>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>>
>>> Yes.  Even with great data for an on-line community [the network map
>>> I linked to several weeks ago on SOCNET] we do not have insights into
>>> the other channels -- private email, phone, F2F, small groups, etc.
>>> I remember some research a while back on how good of an estimate for
>>> total comm could be mined by just looking at on-line comm.
>>>
>>> So maybe if X and Y have a strong tie on-line it can be predicted
>>> that they have a strong tie overall???  Anyone have + or - research
>>> on that?
>>>
>>> Valdis
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jan 15, 2007, at 10:04 AM, Gould N (HESAS - WIHSC) wrote:
>>>
>>> > Given the comment from Valdis on 'back channel emails', identifying
>>> > opinion leadership from available-to-all communications may well
>>> > prove problematic - perhaps even plain wrong.
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > best to all,
>>> >
>>> > nick
>>>
>>> _____________________________________________________________________
>>> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
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>>
>>
>> -- 
>>  joshua.omadadhain@gmail.com...................www.ics.uci.edu/ 
>> ~jmadden
>>   Joshua O'Madadhain: Information Scientist, Musician, Philosopher- 
>> At-Tall
>> It's that moment of dawning comprehension that I live for.  -- Bill  
>> Watterson
>> My opinions are too rational and insightful to be those of any  
>> organization.
>
>_____________________________________________________________________
>SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
>network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
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>UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

----------------------------------------
Caroline Haythornthwaite
Associate Professor
Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
501 East Daniel St., Champaign IL 61820

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