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I second the opinion about Ruby Payne's book. She explains various 
differences among the lower, middle, and upper socioeconomic group in 
a clearly understandable manner. I think it's a must-read for people 
who teach first generation college students and those students who 
enter college at the developmental level. Those two groups of 
students overlap to a great degree.

Lois

Lois Martin, M.S.
Director, Academic Support Center
Goshen College
1700 South Main Street
Goshen, IN 46526
574-535-7576
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At 12:47 PM 2/22/2007, you wrote:
>Hi All,
>
>I'm new to this listserv so excuse me if you've already discussed this.
>But Ruby Payne has a great book, A Framework for Understanding Poverty,
>about the effect of socio-economic class in schools.  One of its main
>themes is the use of language and how it relates to success in school.
>It is one of the best books I've read to help me understand where so
>many of my students are coming from, what rules they are following and
>how I can help them understand their own written and spoken language so
>they can have an educated choice about how they write and converse. It's
>not about good, bad or better or best, it's about having enough
>information to choose what will work for you or not in terms of
>individual success goals.
>
>Vickie
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
>[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Diana Calhoun Bell
>Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 3:42 PM
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: Language, status and discrimination
>
>Hi all,
>It sounds like some of you may be interested in a great little book I
>found that I use with my teacher education candidates (as they seem to
>perpetuate langauge lore). Anyway, it is put out by Penguin and the
>title is Grammar Snobs are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for
>Fun and Spite. The author is June Casagrande. It has great chapters like
>"Snobbery Up With Which You Should Not Put,"Copulative Conjunctions: Hot
>Stuff for the Truly Desperate," and "I'm Writing This While Nakes--The
>Oh-So-Steamy Predicate Nominative."
>Diana Bell
>
>"To do things for students that they can do for themselves is not
>generosity but impatience." (Mina Shaughnessy)
>
>Dr. Diana C. Bell
>Academic Resource Center Director
>136 Madison Hall
>University of Alabama in Huntsville
>Huntsville, AL  35899
>(256)824-3142
>
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