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While I've had mixed success with reading student essays aloud (often
ESL students don't have the native "ear" required to hear the errors), I
agree that using colors to mark repetitions of the same idea works well.
The placement of the color coding usually reveals that the student is
using his/her native rhetorical pattern (i.e. parallel structure
(Semitic native language), indirect/spiral (oriental native language),
or digressive (Romance languages & Russian).  This visualization
provides insight into the organizational pattern being applied by the
student and facilitates the placement of the information into the linear
rhetorical pattern of English.

Amy Spencer
Ohio Dominican University

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Quiles, Dolores
Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2007 1:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Policy for tutoring ESL students in writing


It's important for the student to hear the sentences.  Many times I read
the essay to the student--many students aren't comfortable reading aloud
so I do it for them.  Many times hearing the sentences help the students
to hear their mistakes.  Also for those ESOL students who have trouble
focusing on the thesis statement and developing them, I sometimes take
multi-color highlighters and ask the student to use (with the
highlighter)the same color for the same ideas.  If the student has a
rainbow of colors on the essay, the student will visually note the
inconsistency and disorganization of the essay. Dolores Quiles, Ulster
CCC.   

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lynette Jones
Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 1:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Policy for tutoring ESL students in writing

David-Michael,
Have you seen this thread of info on ESL Tutoring? It may come in hand
in the future.

Lynette
X 212

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Hotchkiss, Chrisa
Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 4:30 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Policy for tutoring ESL students in writing

Dear listers,
I'm working on a policy for writing tutors working with ESL students.
Our tutors don't proofread or edit students' papers. But that line
always seems to be somewhat blurred when working with ESL students whose
errors are often more surface-level grammar and mechanics issue. The
approach some of our tutors use is to carefully analyze with the student
the first page of an essay and then have the student work independently
on the rest of the paper using the feedback from the tutor to look for
similar patterns of errors. However, some ESL students are having
difficulty with this because they know that when they work on their own
without the tutor, they are likely to miss a lot of the errors. So the
first part of the paper will be in better shape than the second and may
affect their grade. I'm thinking a possible strategy to address this
would be to have the student work independently on the second half of
the paper and then bring it back to the tutor one more time for review.
(Our ESL students are allowed two hours a week with a tutor.) Does
anyone else use this practice? Or do you have feedback about how you
address this issue using a different strategy? 
Thanks for any feedback you can provide.
Chrisa


Chrisa Hotchkiss
Director of Learning Services
The Teaching and Learning Center
Bertrand Hall, room 110
Dominican University of California
50 Acacia Ave.
San Rafael, CA  94901
[log in to unmask] 
 
415-257-0153 (phone)
415-257-0177 (fax)

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