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While I agree with many of the points and observations you've made, I
respectfully beg to differ on the notion of withholding financial aid
and denying enrollment in college level courses until all developmental
courses are completed.  My reasons are twofold:

1.) There are plenty of students who ARE serious and persistent enough
to make their best effort to be successful in all classes they take,
required or elected.  Denying financial aid to these people is adding
insult to injury.  Not only do they pay in struggling with the subject
(perhaps because the educational system did them a disservice by not
aptly preparing them for college-level work) but they must also pay
out-of-pocket for the opportunity to take those classes (and the powers
that be let them down once more).  Many times, those in greatest need of
developmental courses are also those greatest in financial need because
of their deficiencies and the limited earning potential created by the
lack of skills for higher paying jobs; for them, this reality may close
the door on any chance of college and getting ahead in their lives.

2.) If I were a student mandated to satisfy all developmental
requirements before being allowed to enroll in any college-level
courses, I am certain I would lose all motivation and interest in
school.  The freedom to take classes that interest students may be the
driving force that keeps them committed to persevere in their studies.
Besides, what about the student who places in the lowest math course but
excels in English or reading?  Should we deny him or her the chance to
be intellectually challenged in areas of strength, with the added
benefit of building the confidence needed to overcome the stigma often
associated with placing into a developmental course to begin with?  That
seems an unfair punishment and a poor means to an end.

It is unfortunate that the reluctant and disinterested students push us
to create drastic measures to deter this type of behavior.


Lisa Marks (formerly McRaven)
Instructor, English & Reading Specialist
Speckman Academic Achievement Center
Ozarks Technical Community College
Springfield, Missouri
(417) 447-8167
"If you think you're too small to have an impact, try going to bed with
a mosquito." --Anita Koddick

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Robert Hackworth
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 10:36 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [LRNASST-L] Attendance-participation

Financial aid is one problem. Some of our retention isssues are related
to
it. 

Some students are required to take courses (like developmental math)
just so
they can enroll in those they want.  The required courses are ignored
while
students go after their interests.

Parental pressure for "going to college" is often not appreciated by the
student who enrolls just to reduce the pressure.

Some students have had experiences that dictums can be ignored without
negative consequences.

I am coming to the view that enrollment in "college level" courses must
be
postponed until all academic deficiencies are overcome.  Until that
time,
financial aid and other courses would not be available.

Florida tried a "three strikes you are out" policy to solve this
problem.
When a student failed a developmental course three times it was supposed
to
be impossible to enroll. That procedure didn't work, but it is unclear
if
the process was bad or that its administration made it another dictum
that
had no negative results.

Bob





> From: Steven Moss <[log in to unmask]>
> Reply-To: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
> <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Wed, 28 Feb 2007 07:32:29 -0600
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Attendance-participation
> 
> How do your programs and schools address high absenteeism/non
> participation by students?For example, in a section with 40 enrollees
> five are No Shows and another 15-20 sort of disappear leaving a core
of
> 15-20 regularly attending students.
> 
> Technically it's not a retention problem and I don't see it as a
> persistence problem. It is a real problem and distorts the fail rate
to
> a point that some of us provide two sets of number one based on
> enrollment and the other based on students who finished the course.
> 
> Administrative withdrawal is not an option. Positive and negative
> incentives as well as personal contact efforts have been marginally
> effective. How do you or how would you approach this issue? All ideas
> and suggestions welcome.
> 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
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browser
> to
> http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
> 
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

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