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what about calling them "Arthur" ?

And if you know to what I am alluding, you're as old as I am..

Seriously, Stan makes a good case.
 Barry Wellman
 _____________________________________________________________________

  Barry Wellman   S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology   NetLab Director
  Centre for Urban & Community Studies          University of Toronto
  455 Spadina Avenue    Toronto Canada M5S 2G8    fax:+1-416-978-7162
  wellman at chass.utoronto.ca  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman
        for fun: http://chass.utoronto.ca/oldnew/cybertimes.php
 _____________________________________________________________________


On Tue, 13 Feb 2007, SOCNET automatic digest system wrote:

> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2007 00:01:55 -0500
> From: SOCNET automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]>
> Reply-To: Social Networks Discussion Forum <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: SOCNET Digest - 11 Feb 2007 to 12 Feb 2007 (#2007-39)
>
> There is 1 message totalling 220 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. FW: you call them ERGs, we call them p* .... how about Frank-Strauss??
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
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> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 13 Feb 2007 08:07:25 +1100
> From:    Garry Robins <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: FW: you call them ERGs, we call them p* .... how about Frank-Strauss??
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Hi Stanley and Mark,
>
> We do indeed owe a lot to Ove Frank.
>
> I'm happy for the models to be called exponential random graph models,
> exponential families of random graphs, or p* models interchangeably.
>
> Cheers
>
>
>
> Garry
>
>
> Dr Garry Robins
> Department of Psychology
> School of Behavioural Science
> University of Melbourne
> Victoria 3010
> Australia
>
> Tel: 61 3 8344 4454
> Fax: 61 3 9347 6618
> Web: www.psych.unimelb.edu.au/people/staff/RobinsG.html
> Melnet website: http://www.sna.unimelb.edu.au/
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Stanley Wasserman
> Sent: Monday, 12 February 2007 10:01 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: you call them ERGs, we call them p* .... how about
> Frank-Strauss??
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
>
>
> Mark:
>
>
>
> Thanks for correcting me on the dependence structure for p2 ---
> indeed, it is
>
> 	a model based on dyadic independence, conditional on the nodal
> attribute variables.
>
>
>
> With respect to names of distributions ....   I suppose I am a
> traditional guy who feels that
>
> 	original names do not necessarily have to be changed.    Paul
> Holland named p1, who told
>
> 	me that he viewed it as the first cool graph distribution.    p*
> was
> named to get away from
>
> 	Ove Frank and David Strauss'   "Markov random graph" label,
> since
> one does not have to
>
> 	have Markov distribution, and because the distribution was so
> cool,
> cooler and better than
>
> 	p1, that it deserved a star.
>
> As for ERGs ---- if only its practitioners retained the important
> "family" part of the name.
>
> 	As far as I know, everyone calls it simply an "exponential
> random
> graph" model, which
>
> 	is perhaps the most uninformative name of all.   All (almost
> all?)
> probability mass functions
>
> 	for graphs can be made exponential --- but clearly not all are
> special exponential FAMILIES.
>
> p1, p*, and so forth, refer to specific distributions;    the label
> exponential can be applied to
>
> 	all random graph distributions.
>
>
>
> I do wish that this class of models was referred to as an exponential
> family (a special beast
>
> 	in statistics), but not even the recent literature does so.   I
>
> believe that the recent literature does not
>
> 	call this an exponential family.      For example,
>
> 		Snijders, T.A.B., Pattison, P., Robins, G.L., & Handock,
> M. (In
> press). New specifications for exponential random graph models.
> Sociological Methodology.
>
> 		Robins, G., Pattison, P., Kalish, Y., & Lusher, D.
> (2005). A
> workshop on exponential random graph (p*) models for social networks.
> Social Networks.
>
> 		Robins, G., Snijders, T., Wang, P., Handcock, M., &
> Pattison, P.
> (2005). Recent developments in Exponential Random Graph (p*) Models
> for Social Networks. Social Networks.
>
> Some of us use the rather long, but certainly more accurate and
> informative phrase
>
> 	"p*, an exponential family of random graphs".
>
>
>
> So, since Mark inquired, those are the reasons I do not use this
> uninformative and uninstructive ERG  label.   Where's that necessary
> "family" noun?
>
>
> It would be preferable, and an nice tribute I think, henceforth to
> refer to this exponential family as
>
> 	Frank-Strauss random graphs, to honor David (and especially Ove)
> who
> first used these
>
> 	ideas in network science.   We network statisticians owe much to
> Ove.
>
>
>
>
> SW
>
>
>
> On Feb 9, 2007, at 9:03 PM, Mark S. Handcock wrote:
>
> > *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> >
> > To add to Stanley's notes:
> >
> > The p2 model does not assume dyad independence. It is explicitly a
> > dyad
> > dependence model, although there is conditional independence given the
> > node-specific random effects.
> >
> > The naming of the exponential family models for networks is a bit
> > problematic. Historically, Holland, Leinhardt and others presented
> > them as
> > exponential families of distributions over the space of graphs. The
> > so-called "p1" model was a particularly useful class presented in
> > their
> > seminal paper with an unfortunately uninstructive name (a non-name
> > really!).
> > The generalization by Frank and Strauss is a general statistical
> > exponential
> > family of distributions over graphs. The specification of the
> > statistics
> > constitutes the modeling part. This is the reason recent work
> > references
> > them as (statistical) exponential family models. A number of
> > acronyms or
> > combination of terms to capture this make sense, and constructively
> > describe
> > the statistical roots and connections of the model class. The
> > utility of the
> > "p*" name is unclear to me (perhaps Stanley can describe why he
> > prefers it
> > to the earlier name?).
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Mark
> >
> > -------------------------------------------------
> > Mark S. Handcock
> > Professor of Statistics
> > Department of Statistics, C014-B Padelford Hall
> > University of Washington, Box 354322     Phone:  (206) 221-6930
> > Seattle, WA  98195-4322.                 FAX:    (360) 365-6324
> > Web:  www.stat.washington.edu/~handcock
> > internet:  [log in to unmask]
> >
> >
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
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> ------------------------------
>
> End of SOCNET Digest - 11 Feb 2007 to 12 Feb 2007 (#2007-39)
> ************************************************************
>

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