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Hello All,

For all those who asked for a list of citations. Well there does not seem 
to be much material around at the moment as I only got two emails in reply. 

The first citation was a chapter entitled "Why some occupations are better 
known than others" which is from a forthcoming book on social capital 
edited by Bonnie H. Erickson and Nan Lin, Oxford University Press.

The second citations were Michelle Jackson and John Goldthorpe, on the 
skills employers seek in different occupations and Weeden & Grusky, 2005 
AJS, where they show that occupations matter rather than classes.

Regards,
Mark




On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 11:25:15 -0400, Mark Wilkinson <[log in to unmask]> 
wrote:

>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
>Hello All,
>
>Does anyone know of any work which has been done on the social networks
>which exist for various occupations and the influence which is exerted by
>these occupations over their respective social networks.
>
>
>For example, since the sales occupation requires the ability to have better
>communication, the ability to form more and better relationships, etc than
>say the carpentry occupation, the sales occupation may have:
>     1) more connections in their social network
>              a) and so there is more chance the sales individual would
>have “betweeness” and be more influential in his social network;
>     2) “radiality” and so more influence in his social network;  etc.
>
>Also a sales manger would have a more hierarchical network than a sales
>person at work and so have more influence than the normal sales person at
>work. But this influence from the top could permeate into the social
>networks of the normal sales persons and so the sales manager has indirect
>influence.
>
>
>Thank you,
>Mark.
>
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