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I can accept that this report is flawed--it's not from a reliable 
birding source, but I thought it was of interest.  I have been 
wondering, especially when the smoke gets heavy here, how the birds 
react.  Don't have any sources that I know of that say they hunker 
down, or fly from it, or become dioriented or impaired.  So I was 
interested to hear this report.  I can live with a misidentified 
species--but wonder if the general phenomenon is true.

Dotty

-- "Bryant Roberts" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I checked out this link and also saw the local TV news article on 
which it
was probably based, both were based on information provided by 
wildlife
rehab people with no input from birders and contained errors and
questionable information.  The birds identified in the web article as
Yellow Warblers were actually Common Yellowthroats and in the TV 
version
they were much closer and called them "Yellowthroat Warblers".  Yellow
Warblers are usually rare during spring migration in Southeast 
Florida and
I've seen none here this spring.  In the TV version one of the rehab 
people
who was also a chiropractor said that he was treating the injured 
birds by
adjusting their necks and that they were also giving them a pain 
killer
which in the web version was identified as ibuprofen.  I know little 
about
veterinary medicine but both these treatments seemed unusual to me 
with the
possibility of doing more harm than good.

Due to the prolonged west winds over the last week caused by the 
unusual
subtropical storm off Northeast Florida and possibly the smoky haze 
that
has at times limited visibility to as little as a mile we have been 
seeing
unusual numbers of late migrants, mostly Common Yellowthroats but also
plenty of American Redstarts, and Blackpoll Warblers as well as lesser
numbers of seven or eight other warbler species.  I've heard reports 
of
numbers of birds, mostly Common Yellowthroats, being killed and 
injured by
collisions with cars and windows in developed areas near the coast 
but in
the more natural areas I've been birding during the last week there 
was no
unusual mortality.  The bird banders I've talked with said the birds
they've handled showed no unusual signs of stress.  It has been a 
very good
week for birding in the Broward and Dade County area but as is so 
often the
case what is good for the birders is usually bad for the birds but 
I've
seen little evidence of a major migration disaster in South Florida.

Bryant Roberts
Davie, Fl


> [Original Message]
> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: 5/15/2007 10:41:52 AM
> Subject: [FLBIRDS] Smoke & Its Effect On Migrants
>
> This link was posted to another FL listserve.  All FL birders 
should 
> be aware:
>
>
> http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=3170782
>
> Dotty Robbins
> High Springs
>
>
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