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Is anybody else bothered by the concept implied here?  "[W]e are seeking 
solutions/alternatives to training instructors to reach reading courses."

Is it really the goal of graduate programs to "train people to teaching 
reading courses" for the community college job market?   Why would a 
college want to hire someone who has merely been trained to teach a 
course?  Within one semester I could train part-time student employees 
to teach a reading course, but they wouldn't become reading educators as 
a result, would they?

Wouldn't a college rather hire someone with a degree in reading 
education who could, yes, teaching reading courses, but also help ground 
those courses in some deep thinking about the campus, the purposes for 
which students might want to improve their reading competence, what 
kinds of reading tasks they will encounter at the college and 
thereafter, knowledge of faculty expectations for these students, and 
understanding of the students' experience?   In fact, wouldn't campuses 
want to hire reading educators who can weigh alternatives to formal 
courses and provide appropriate options for the institution's students?

Karen


Kimberly Zernechel wrote:

>Dr. Moreno,
>
>At Minneapolis Community and Technical College we offer two levels of
>developmental reading and one college-level reading course.  Students
>are placed in the course using the Accuplacer.
>
>We have a mixture of full-time and adjunct faculty teaching these
>courses.  We currently have 5 full-time faculty (with one on
>reassignment to our Learning Center) and 7 adjunct.  Not really fair.
>
>Many of our instructors have elementary, middle or high school
>experience in teaching reading.  The University of Minnesota does offer
>some adult literacy courses, although they aren't necessarily
>appropriate for the students we serve.  Hamline University offers a
>Teaching Reading course that kind of fits the bill.  The U of M also has
>a couple of courses in the Curriculum and Instruction Department that
>work.  Some of us are currently taking the on-line courses offered
>through Cal State Fullerton.  They offer a post-secondary reading
>certificate, all done on-line.  One of our faculty has finished the
>certificate; one other is half done.  This is the only program we know
>of specifically geared toward teachers in post-secondary reading
>programs.
>
>Challenges we face:  we are always at the mercy of the legislature. 
>There seems to be a move toward putting developmental reading back in
>the high schools.  We've gotten used to this threat.  Keeping students
>in the developmental program is a challenge.  For whatever reason(s),
>developmental students are at greater risk for dropping out.  This is a
>perennial problem at our school.  
>
>I hope this information is helpful.
>
>Kim Zernechel
>Minneapolis Community and Technical College
>Reading/Study Skills Department
>
>  
>
>>>>[log in to unmask] 06/07/07 16:41 PM >>>
>>>>        
>>>>
>One of my colleagues will soon go on sabbatical leave to learn trends,
>challenges, and structure of reading programs at the community college
>level.  
>
>Would you please answer as many of the following questions as possible:
>1.  How are reading courses taught at your institution?  How many
>courses are offered?  What is the sequence?
>
>2.  Who teaches those courses?  FT/adjunct?  What is the ratio of FT to
>adjunct?
>
>3.  Where/How are instructors trained?  (SBCC is experiencing difficulty
>attracting instructors who are qualified to teach reading; the MA
>program at UC Santa Barbara was discontinued approximately 10 years ago,
>and the closest institutions which offer reading programs are 1 1/2
>hours south of Santa Barbara and  2 1/2 hours north, so we are seeking
>solutions/alternatives to training instructors to reach reading
>courses.)
>
>4.  What are other challenges your institution if facing regarding
>teaching reading and composition at the developmental level?
>
>Thanks for your replies.
>
>Dr.  Elida Moreno
>English Skills Depetment Chair
>Santa Barbara City College
>
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