Print

Print


Sept. 17, 2007


Students' 'Evolving' Use of Technology


Stop the presses: Today's college students are using more technology than
ever.

That may not be the most surprising finding from a report released last week
<http://connect.educause.edu/library/abstract/TheECARStudyofUnderg/45075?tim
e=1189954853>  by the Educause Center for Applied Research, the analytical
arm of the nonprofit group that promotes effective technology use in higher
education. But it certainly provides a jumping-off point for an
investigation into how students use information technology in college and
how it can be harnessed to improve the learning experience.

In at least one central respect, proponents of technology in the classroom
are on to something: Most students (60.9 percent) believe it improves their
learning.

The changes in technological habits aren't revolutionary per se, as the
authors point out; rather, students are making "evolutionary" gains in
access to the Internet for everyday uses, inside the classroom and out.
Perhaps the most visible of these changes is the continuing increase in the
proportion of students with laptops, which has grown to 73.7 percent of
respondents (while an almost-total 98.4 percent own a computer of some
kind). More surprisingly, over half of laptop owners don't bring them to
class at all, with about a quarter carrying them to lectures at least once a
week.

The amount of time spent on the Internet also shows no sign of abating, with
an average of about 18 hours a week, for any purpose - 

Source/continue:  http://insidehighered.com/news/2007/09/17/it

Sept. 17, 2007


College Accountability Movement Moves Online


One by one, coalitions of colleges of different sorts and stripes have
wrestled with the best way to respond to the intensifying public pressure to
prove their value and their effectiveness in educating students. Proposals
have come from state colleges and universities
<http://www.nasulgc.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=280&srcid=183> , major
<http://insidehighered.com/news/2007/05/07/aau>  research institutions and
private colleges
<http://www.naicu.edu/member_center/id.669,Secure.False/memberNews_detail.as
p>  - and not surprisingly, each has been tailored to the specific goals of
the proponents.

The latest entrant in what might be called the accountability sweepstakes
comes from an entirely new set of institutions - a small group of colleges
(some for-profit, some nonprofit, but all regionally accredited) that
operate online and focus primarily on educating adults. And as with its
predecessors,
<http://presidentsforum.excelsior.edu/images/PrinciplesGoodPractice.pdf>
"Transparency by Design," as the plan is called, has distinctive
characteristics that reflect the colleges' distinctive missions.

Like the accountability proposals put forward by other groups of
institutions, the plan crafted by these colleges provides some data that can
be compared across institutions, including scores on the National Survey of
Student Engagement <http://www.nsse/index.cfm>  and the performance of
students in general education courses, as measured by the Educational
Testing Service's Measurement of Academic Proficiency and Progress.
<http://www.ets.org/portal/site/ets/menuitem.1488512ecfd5b8849a77b13bc392150
9/?vgnextoid=ff3aaf5e44df4010VgnVCM10000022f95190RCRD&vgnextchannel=f98546f1
674f4010VgnVCM10000022f95190RCRD> 

Source/continue:  http://insidehighered.com/news/2007/09/17/adult

 

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]