Print

Print


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

As an IRB committee member, one of the things I see most often in 
applications that are not immediately successful, is a lack of detail 
as to why specific data is needed and limited information on how that 
data will be used.  I'm betting that a rework of the application with 
more detail to the above, and covering how the data will be protected 
during use and presented in publications, etc will be successful.

IRB's are made up of peers but that does not necessarily mean they will 
immediately understand your specific research.  Write as though you are 
addressing a general audience...and give a bib if needed to make your 
points clear.  Also if you are doing research that is new to the 
institution - protected population work especially - ask to attend the 
IRB meeting to answer questions so everyone understands what you are 
doing.  It's your process, shepherd it.

Let me know if I can help.

Lois Ann Scheidt

Doctoral Student - School of Library and Information Science, Indiana
University, Bloomington IN USA

Adjunct Instructor - School of Informatics, IUPUI, Indianapolis IN USA and
IUPUC, Columbus IN USA

Webpage:  http://www.loisscheidt.com
Blog:  http://www.professional-lurker.com


Quoting Steven Corman <[log in to unmask]>:

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Has anyone made further headway on how to deal with IRB demands that
> people named in network questionnaires be considered consenting
> subjects?  A student just submitted a proposal and got this reply from
> our IRB:
>
>
>
> "There are spaces in the survey that ask respondents to list the names
> of people they know or who influence them.  Please add the text 'Please
> do not identify any individual by name-use a fake name or title for that
> person instead' to each place this occurs.  If other people are
> identified within the survey then they would qualify as subjects also
> and would have to consent to data about them being used."
>
>
>
> As discussed at a Sunbelt a couple of years back, this makes network
> research impractical to impossible.  If I am going to fight them I could
> use some ammunition.
>
>
>
> Thanks...
>
>
>
> Steve
>
>
>
> _____________________________________________
>
> Steven R. (Steve) Corman
>
> Professor, Hugh Downs School of Human Communication
>
> Arizona State University
>
> http://www.public.asu.edu/~corman/
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.