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The other argument cited in the article is for conservation. Do we really
need 2200 megawatts? What kind of infrastructure investment would it take
significantly reduce the $17 billion cost associated with achieving this
capacity? I don't know the answers, but hopefully someone on BEST does. I'm
not necessarily against nuclear, but the scale of this thing is open to
serious question by regulators and customers (which includes me). If the
cost estimate has already tripled, I'm not so confident that it may not
increase yet again before we're all through. 

Jason
     

-----Original Message-----
From: Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology Society
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Frank Leslie
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 10:20 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Nuclear Upfront cost triples/ think solar

So the construction cost is $17000000 / 2200 megawatts = $7.7 per watt.
Solar
electricity is about $10/W not counting storage for when the sun is shining
(4.7
sun hours per day in Central Florida). The solar fuel costs are zero, but
there
is an add-on for the nuclear plant over its lifetime.

Frank 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology Society
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]
On Behalf Of Kathleen Pagan
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 9:20 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Nuclear Upfront cost triples/ think solar

http://www.sptimes.com/2008/03/11/Business/Price_triples_for_Pro.shtml

 

Progress Energy tripled its estimate for its new nuclear power plant in Levy
County, saying Monday that the new price is$17-billion.

 

****************

According to the book "A Golden Thread, 2500 Years of Solar Architecture and
Technology"( 1980, Butti & Perlin, Cheshire Books, Palo Alto),  in
1941 solar water heaters outsold conventional units in Miami by two to one.
(Page 152)

 

The book concludes, "History offers many lessons that can smooth our
transition
to this new (solar) age.  The successes and failures of past generations can
help guide us in the development of solar applications.
But the most important lesson is that solar energy can be a practical
alternative to scarce fossil fuels." (Page 253)

 

Kathleen

 

Kathleen W. Pagan, AICP, Senior Planner

(352) 374-5249  http://growth-management.alachua.fl.us/

 

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail

 

 



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