Print

Print


Unanimous! (Except for some variances :)

Mark van Soestbergen
Coordinator, UF Climate Neutrality Working Group
[log in to unmask]
www.icbe.com
352.284.8221 direct


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Dr. Ann C. Wilkie" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2008 11:47 PM
Subject: Re: Going Biodiesel Is No Cheap Alternative


> BESTers,
>
> "Fossil fuel is fossil thinking" and in this we are unanimous?
>
> __________________________________
>
> Harald W. Kegelmann wrote:
>
>> What most people in this country refuse to accept is that we can't
>> grow ourselves out of the coming shortage of oil supply. The problem
>> is not the cost of biodiesel production. Once oil hits $200/barrel
>> this problem will take care of itself.
>>
>> We simply can't get from here to there without a significant, and I
>> mean SIGNIFICANT change in life style.
>>
>> In Florida, we consume about 8 BILLION gallons of gasoline. Research
>> at IFAS shows that theoretically, we have enough biomass in the state
>> to generate 8 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol a year. Well, for
>> years, the largest biodiesel plant in the state had a capacity of 20
>> million gallons/year (mg/y). We would need 400 plants of that size to
>> get to 8 billion. Permitting and construction would take about 18
>> month. So we are talking about 600 years in construction time.
>>
>> The largest COMMERCIAL cellulosic ethanol plant based on Dr. Ingram's
>> technology has a capacity of 300,000 gallons a year or 1.5 percent of
>> a 20 mg/y plant.
>>
>> No technology can replace an energy source and there simply is no
>> energy source like oil. We can't get from here to there with any type
>> of fossil fuel or biofuel. The numbers just don't add up. The sun is
>> the only energy source that will be around for a while. The sooner we
>> get that and switch to a solar based economy the better. There will be
>> winners and losers as the supply of oil dries out.
>>
>> Germany plans to install 1,000 more solar power this year than the
>> installed capacity of solar in the "Sunshine State." Abu Dhabi plans
>> to invest $15 BILLION to establish a renewable energy economy:
>>
>> http://www.photon-magazine.com/news_archiv/details.aspx?cat=News_PI&sub=africa&pub=4&parent=954
>>
>> What happened to the pony express and the mainframe will happen to
>> those how try desperately to hang on to the old ways of the fossil
>> fuel century.
>>
>>    Harry
>>
>>
>>>If diesel from petroleum oil is expensive, biodiesel from soybean oil is
>>>almost ludicrous.  Rising costs of farm operations along with a decreased
>>>supply and increased demand are keeping biodiesel prices sky high and
>>>preventing it from becoming a widely applied alternative fuel.
>>>
>>>A biodiesel feedstock that is not tied to petroleum consumption seems to 
>>>be
>>>the most logical.
>>>Algae- powered by the sun, nutrient-rich wastewater, and carbon dioxide-
>>>could be applied in the production of such a feedstock.
>>>
>>>-Scott J.E.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>http://www.usnews.com/blogs/beyond-the-barrel/2008/03/25/going-biodiesel-is-no-cheap-alternative.html
>>>Going Biodiesel Is No Cheap Alternative March 25, 2008 03:28 PM ET | 
>>>Marianne
>>>Lavelle<http://www.usnews.com/Topics/tag/Author/m/marianne_lavelle/index.html>|
>>>Permanent
>>>Link<http://www.usnews.com/blogs/beyond-the-barrel/2008/3/25/going-biodiesel-is-no-cheap-alternative.html>
>>>
>>>The retail cost of highway diesel fuel is $3.99 per gallon—thanks to 
>>>tough
>>>environmental rules and strong global demand, especially in Europe. The
>>>national average retail price of diesel hit an all-time high for five 
>>>weeks
>>>in a row, is above $4 per gallon in plenty of places, and is up 50 
>>>percent
>>>over one year ago.
>>>
>>>I thought this might make it a good market for biodiesel, the alternative
>>>fuel blended from vegetable or plant oils, but then I saw Autobloggreen's
>>>report<http://www.autobloggreen.com/2008/03/16/high-soybean-price-halts-biodiesel-production-in-minnesota-plant/>on
>>>a Minnesota biodiesel plant that was halting production, at least
>>>temporarily, because of skyrocketing soybean oil costs.
>>>
>>>Guess what? Petroleum prices have yanked farm prices up right along with
>>>them, because of rising farm energy costs and rising use of biofuels. By
>>>now, everyone knows about corn prices and
>>>ethanol<http://www.usnews.com/usnews/news/articles/070204/12ethanol.htm>,
>>>but keep in mind that when farmers turn soy acres to corn for ethanol, 
>>>that
>>>means higher prices for soy—the most common feedstock for biodiesel in 
>>>the
>>>United States. So the rising petroleum tide lifts all alternative
>>>boats......
>>>continued at:
>>>
>>>
>>>http://www.usnews.com/blogs/beyond-the-barrel/2008/03/25/going-biodiesel-is-no-cheap-alternative.html
>>>
>
> -- 
> **********************************************************************
> Dr. Ann C. Wilkie                          Tel: (352)392-8699
> Soil and Water Science Department          Fax: (352)392-7008
> University of Florida-IFAS
> P.O. Box 110960                         E-mail: [log in to unmask]
> Gainesville, FL 32611-0960
> ______________________________________________________________________
> Campus location: Environmental Microbiology Laboratory (Bldg. 246).
> http://campusmap.ufl.edu/
> ______________________________________________________________________
> BioEnergy and Sustainable Technology Society
> http://grove.ufl.edu/~bests/
>
> **********************************************************************