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Hi Jennifer:

I am very interested in your monopoly version.  Would you be willing to 
share more details of the game?

Seana

___________________________
Seana R. Logsdon
Director of Academic Support
Empire State College
Genesee Valley Center
1475 Winton Road North
Rochester, NY 14609
585-224-3206




Jennifer Pippen <[log in to unmask]> 
Sent by: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals 
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04/22/2008 04:24 PM
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Re: Time Management Games & Activities






I have two time management activities my students always like to do. The 
first is the continuum. I put a one, five, ten, fifteen and twenty-four on 
pieces of paper and tape them to the floor. I then ask the students to 
think about an average day for them (a weekday is preferable). They then 
walk up the amount of hours they engage in an activity I name (i.e. text 
messaging, watching TV, hanging out, just chillin). They are to add the 
hours together for each activity and continue to walk up the continuum. 
Near the end I ask them what I have missed (usually going to class, 
studying, talking to professors, sleeping, eating). We then have a 
discussion about where they are using their hours and how they are trying 
to add more things in a day than is possible.
 
I also do a monopoly version of this. I give all the students $300 
(approx. weekly salary of a student with some college education). Then I 
will give or take away money with activities I mention. The students think 
about the week before when I mention the activities. For example, in the 
last week, if you went to all your classes, I will give you $100. I will 
take way $50 if you did not turn one assignment in on time. We talk about 
when they get out into a job how their decisions can affect the income 
they earn. We also talk about the cost of education and getting the most 
for their money.
 
Jenny
 
________________________________
Jenny Pippen
Assistant Director of Academic Support
North Central College
30 North Brainard Street
Naperville, Illinois 60540
630-637-5264
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>>> Patricia Foster <[log in to unmask]> 4/22/2008 3:07 PM >>>
One of the activities I do with my students to help them learn time 
management is to make a list of regular things that have to be done in the 
week (laundry, shopping, working, cooking, cleaning, commuting, paying 
bills, etc). Then give them a grid with the days of the week and the hours 
on it, and have them work out the schedule- but in small groups. The 
difference is that each group gets a little different instruction. For 
example, one group gets instructions that says "the kids are feeling a 
little needy this week, and you really need to spend a little more quality 
time on them. It means that well deserved Mom recognition..
   The next group gets instructions that says: That big project you knew 
was coming is here. It is time to give that big push toward getting that 
project done. It means well deserved office recognition!
    The next group gets one that says: You feel that you need to be a 
great role model for volunteering, and doing those projects as community 
service! It means that well deserved volunteer recognition.
     The next group may get one that says: You and the family have been 
working so hard, that your relationships have been suffering a bit. A 
little quality time with that special someone is really called for. It 
means some well deserved special time.
 
  In other words, each group gets a priority of all of those things that 
we keep juggling all the time. It is fun to have them compare their 
schedules, and then explain what their priority was and how differently 
the schedules get organzed, having only one priority, but where we 
actually have all of these we try to prioritize all the time.  Have fun 
with creating the scenarios depending on the groups involved. Hope it 
helps!.
 
"Mayfield, Linda" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
  Kate,
I divide my students into small groups and have them figure out how they
spend a week of time, on average, by hours per activity. I DO NOT
mention how many hours there are in a week. Some students are
traditional, some 20-something single moms, some are middle-aged
returning students, etc., and it really gets them talking to each other,
because they have to come to a consensus for the group to report. Each
group reports and I write their numbers on the board for discussion,
then total them. Some groups come up with any more than 128 hours, and
some come up with many less--it opens the door for great discussions
about time awareness, prioritizing, and how to use discretionary time,
and helps them know and appreciate each other's challenges as well.
Linda 

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Kate Jakobson
Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2008 1:35 PM
To: [log in to unmask] 
Subject: Time Management Games & Activities

Hi All:



Does anyone know of any fun game-type activities that could be used for
a time management workshop? One of our Student Services people is
conducting a workshop for older (non-student) adults on time management
and is looking for fun/game activities, not necessarily
academics-oriented, that she could use with them. Most of my time
management material is aimed at students and while useful, isn't what I
would call 'fun and games'. J



Any ideas or pointers to websites, etc. would be welcome.



Kate

Kate Jakobson, Director

Tutoring and Student Success

Kirtland Community College

989.275.5000 x 211


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