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Scaling Theory For Information Networks , Interface

Excerpt: Networks distribute energy, materials and information to the
components of a variety of natural and human-engineered systems, including
organisms, brains, the Internet and microprocessors. Distribution networks
enable the integrated and coordinated functioning of these systems, and
they also constrain their design. The similar hierarchical branching
networks observed in organisms (...). Metabolic scaling theory (MST) shows
that the rate at which networks deliver energy to an organism is
proportional to its mass raised to the 3/4 power. We show that
computational systems are also characterized by nonlinear network scaling
and use MST principles to characterize how information networks scale.

Scaling Theory For Information Networks, M. E. Moses , S. Forrest , A. L.
Davis , M. A. Lodder , J. H. Brown, 2008/05/09, DOI:
10.1098/rsif.2008.0091, Interface
http://journals.royalsociety.org/content/c7v0v823m44663t6/?p=2c60606a766846d7af4da7554a
1f99ff&pi=0

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 Concept and Definition of Complexity , arXiv

Abstract: The term complexity is used informally both as a quality and as
a quantity. As a quality, complexity has something to do with our ability
to understand a system or object -- we understand simple systems, but not
complex ones. On another level, complexity is used as a quantity, when we
talk about something being more complicated than another.
 In this chapter, we explore the formalisation of both meanings of
complexity, which happened during the latter half of the twentieth
century.

* [43] Concept and Definition of Complexity, Russell K. Standish,
2008/05/06, DOI: 0805.0685, arXiv
[43] http://uk.arXiv.org/abs/0805.0685


 Barry Wellman
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  S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, FRSC              NetLab Director
  Department of Sociology                        University of Toronto
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