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For more on corn syrup as a sweetener and corn as cattle feed watch  
"King Corn"

   http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/video/?video_id=83

You will stop drinking sodas and pay attention to your diet after you  
watched this documentary.

   Harry

> I wouldn't expect this to effect food prices that much.  As I
> understand it, we use high fructose corn syrup as sweetener in our food
> more often then sugar.  I would expect the floods in the Midwest to
> have a more visible effect on food prices, at least in the short term.
>
> Best wishes,
> Gabriel Espinosa
>
> On Thu Jun 26 10:27:23 EDT 2008, Frank Leslie <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> I haven't seen any mention of the effect of removing that much   
>> sugar from the
>> food market in all the news reports. We use so much (too much)   
>> sugar in foods
>> now, so I would expect a huge food price increase. We can increase our
>> dependancies on other countries for sugar. It's worked so well for oil, you
>> know.
>>
>> Frank Leslie
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology Society   
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>> On Behalf Of Tyson,Richard V
>> Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2008 8:47 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Historic Everglades deal is reached
>>
>> Loss of 2000+ jobs, collapse of the economies in Clewiston, Belle Glade, and
>> Pahokee...end of an era.  Working at U.S. Sugar helped to put me   
>> and many others
>> through college.
>> Regards,
>> Richard Tyson, PhD
>> Multicounty Extension Agent IV
>> 407-665-5554
>> [log in to unmask]
>> ________________________________________
>> From: Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology Society [[log in to unmask]] On
>> Behalf Of Tim [[log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2008 1:38 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Historic Everglades deal is reached
>>
>> In the alternative what is the economic impact to the county and city
>> governments budgets when a substantial source of tax revenue is eliminated?
>> Tim Center
>> Sustainable Florida - Collins Center
>> 850.212.2684 - cell
>> Sent from my BlackBerryR smartphone with SprintSpeed
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Puneet Dwivedi <[log in to unmask]>
>>
>> Date:         Wed, 25 Jun 2008 13:21:13
>> To:[log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Historic Everglades deal is reached
>>
>>
>> Dear All,
>>
>> Just a thought and nothing else. As about 40% area of total   
>> sugarcane production
>> will be gone with this deal. I was just wondering about the impact   
>> of this deal
>> on the future supply of ethanol from cellulosic feedstock   
>> especially in context
>> of Florida which has a strategic advantage over other states in terms of
>> sugarcane availability. It will be really interesting to see how   
>> biofuel demand
>> and conservation challenges go hand in hand in future. I am not   
>> including food
>> demand with respect to sugarcane assuming that only residues are used for
>> ethanol extraction.
>>
>> Remember, times article on Brazilian rain forests.
>>
>> Any thoughts are welcome.
>>
>> Best
>> Puneet Dwivedi
>> PhD Student
>> SFRC, UFL
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 1:47 PM, Dr. Ann C. Wilkie <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Historic Everglades deal is reached
>>> Gainesville Sun/Associated Press, 25 June 2008
>>>
>>> "WELLINGTON - In one of the biggest conservation deals in U.S.   
>>> history, the nation's largest producer of cane sugar reached a   
>>> tentative agreement Tuesday to get out of the business and sell   
>>> its nearly 300 square miles in the Everglades to the state of   
>>> Florida for $1.75
>> billion.
>>>
>>> The deal with U.S. Sugar Corp. results from a convergence of interests:
>>> The state is trying to restore the Everglades and clean up   
>>> pollution caused by Big Sugar and other growers, while the   
>>> American sugar industry is being squeezed by low-price imports.
>>>
>>> Under the deal, the state would buy U.S. Sugar's holdings in the   
>>> Everglades south of Lake Okeechobee, including its cane fields,   
>>> mill and railroad line. U.S. Sugar would be allowed to farm the   
>>> 187,000 acres for six more years, after which it would go out of   
>>> business.
>>>
>>> The state would then protect the land from development, which has   
>>> been encroaching on the Everglades for decades.
>>>
>>> State officials would also build a network of reservoirs and   
>>> marshes to filter water flowing into the Everglades and help   
>>> restore the River of Grass to a cleaner, more natural state. For   
>>> generations, farming and development have blocked the natural flow  
>>>  of water and allowed fertilizers and other pollutants to spill   
>>> into the wetlands.
>>>
>>> Negotiations are still going on, and officials hope to sign a   
>>> final agreement by September.
>>>
>>> The deal would not end sugar production in the Everglades. Some   
>>> 300,000 acres of land, or close to 500 square miles, used by other  
>>>  companies would remain in production.
>>>
>>>
>>> http://www.gainesville.com/article/20080625/NEWS/952971959/1002/NEWS&t
>>> itle=Historic_Everglades_deal_is_reached
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> **********************************************************************
>>> Dr. Ann C. Wilkie                          Tel: (352)392-8699
>>> Soil and Water Science Department          Fax: (352)392-7008
>>> University of Florida-IFAS
>>> P.O. Box 110960                         E-mail: [log in to unmask]
>>> Gainesville, FL 32611-0960
>>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>> Campus location: Environmental Microbiology Laboratory (Bldg. 246).
>>> http://campusmap.ufl.edu/
>>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>> BioEnergy and Sustainable Technology Society  http://grove.ufl.edu/~bests/
>>>
>>> **********************************************************************
>>>