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*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Read paper by Valdis Krebs and June Holley
http://www.orgnet.com/BuildingNetworks.pdf and our blog
http://www.networkweaving.com/blog

Also, I am part of Plexus Institute.org team helping hospitals working to
eliminate MRSA (penicillin -resistant staph) map their networks, then use
those maps to encourage collaboration across some of the traditional divides
(roles, units) to generate creative solutions.

I'm also part of several year-long programs to train cross-organizational
Network Weavers to map and enhance networks as well as catalyze
collaborations. In several projects we will be using Web 2.0 tools
(Near-Time, Twitter, etc) to enhance both the network building and the cross
organizational collaboration.

Be glad to talk with you!


 
June Holley
Network Weaver
www.networkweaving.com/june.html
www.networkweaving.com/blog
+1-740-591-4705





On 09/11/08 9:45 AM, "Justin Kirby" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> 
> Given all the hype around crowdsourcing, co-creation, wikinomics, open
> innovation, etc., just wondered if anyone was aware of any really good
> examples of where collaboration has led to successful innovation, and did
> these make use of particular tools/technology to support the collaboration?
> 
> The question may not be directly relevant to the network science and social
> network analysis audience here, but I understand that at least some of you
> look at the structures by which knowledge/information transfers through
> networks and organisations. The link between this and collaborative approaches
> maybe tenuous, but as far as this initial scoping research project (see below)
> is concerned it would be fascinating for us to get feedback from this
> community, because we are looking for more structured and scientific insight
> than what's currently being evangelicised in the Web 2.0 space.
> 
> Justin Kirby
> co-author, Connected Marketing
> 
> 
> Project background and purpose
> 
> We are carrying out a piece of scoping research for NESTA Connect (The
> National Endowment for Science Technology and Arts) to develop understanding
> of how the use of new and emerging collaborative technologies can add value in
> co-creation and lead to innovations
> 
> Traditionally, the search for new ideas has tended to happen Œbehind closed
> doorsı, in research labs and design departments, all carefully protected by
> intellectual property rights. But this is rapidly changing. Today, innovation
> is far less controlled and predictable. A good idea can come from (literally)
> anywhere.
> 
> This greater fluidity is hugely positive for innovation. NESTA are developing
> a range of programmes that encourage people to connect across organisations,
> places and disciplines. They believe that putting people and organisations
> together in unusual combinations sparks new ideas and new perspectives on old
> problems.
> 
> It is our view that there is no shortage of ³new perspectives on old problems²
> within the co-creationist space.  What seems to be lacking is any real
> analysis of how new technologies address the challenges inherent of
> participation and collaboration, many of which relate to aspects of human
> behaviour and/or organisational structures ­ just because you are using a new
> technology doesnıt mean these challenges disappear.  Advances in technology,
> and the success of the Open Source development methodology that has led to
> these advances, may provide a solution to these inherent problems, but so also
> may other ³new ideas and new perspectives² that donıt rely on technology.
> 
> The question we want to address is:  can we find a structured way to assess
> and/or enhance the likely effectiveness of collaborative work assisted by
> technology by looking first at some of these inherent barriers to
> participation and collaboration from those sectors and disciplines which have
> been discussing, using and evaluating them for over 30 years ­ rather than
> those who coming to them for the first time because of the opportunities ³Web
> 2.0² presents ­ and the hype encouraging its use.  As they say "those who
> cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it²Š
> 
> Preliminary scoping - initial questions
> 
> 1.  In your experience of collaboration, are there particular models of good
> practice which you have experience of or can refer us to?
> 
> 2. Are you aware of any really good examples of where collaboration has led to
> successful innovation?
> 
> 3. Of these, did any of these make use of particular tools/technology to
> support the collaboration?
> 
> 4. In our consideration of tools, collaboration and innovation, can you
> identify any:
> - people you think it would be useful for us to contact?
> - papers published which would be useful?
> 
> 5.  Would you be interested in being involved further in this project in any
> way? (eg be interviewed by our researcher)
> 
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