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Thanks for the feedback Dale. Your kind of insight and expertise is exactly what I was hoping to elicit with my questions.

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Dale Katherine Ireland
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 4:08 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: working with blind students in basic writing

Hi Angela, 



I want to build of off William's important point.  There are many students who, for various reasons, use speech recognition programs to compose their papers.  I have blind students and students with learning disabilities, among other students, who use speech recognition programs--dictating to a program that converts the written word into text--when writing all their drafts and giving peer feedback.  These students work with texts much in the same way that students typing at a computer do in that they revise their work as they develop ideas, delete tangents and select sentence structures and words that best communicate their ideas.  



You bring up an important point about the distinction between writing and speaking.  I think that writers who use speech recognition programs when working with writing as a process instead of solely as a product do develop as writers in the same ways as their peers who write with keyboards.  When I was a learning skills counselor at UC Berkeley I also found this to be the case with my upper division students. 



Dale 

-- 
Dale Katherine Ireland 
University Thesis Editor and 
Department of English, Adjunct Lecturer 
California State University, East Bay 
25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard 
Hayward, California 94542-3037 
Review editor for H-Net's Online Education the Humanities (H-OEH) <http://www.h-net.org/~oeh/> 



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Angela Huettl" <[log in to unmask]> 
To: [log in to unmask] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 12:50:59 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific 
Subject: Re: working with blind students in basic writing 

My concern is that process writing centers on the growth of writers' abilities and ideas through revising their writing, working through the important and complex task of taking ideas they can discuss in class and turning those ideas into a cohesive and coherent paper. When my student dictates his ideas to a scribe, he is in fact giving an impromptu speech, which is an important skill, to be sure, but a different one than creating a cohesive and coherent written text. I'm concerned that allowing my student to dictate his work will shortchange his learning in my course, but I also want to be sure that research supports the need to have him do his own typing. Thus, my desire for resources that discuss working with blind students in basic writing. 


-----Original Message----- 
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of William W. Ziegler 
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 3:27 PM 
To: [log in to unmask] 
Subject: Re: working with blind students in basic writing 

I did a quick check in CompPile 
(http://comppile.org/search/comppile_main_search.php) but saw nothing 
that looked on target. 
I'm wondering about the problem with the process-writing approach and 
why it wouldn't fit with dictation to a scribe. Would dictation to a 
voice-to-text software program have the same conflict? 

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