Print

Print


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

I have to concur with June on this one. Friend count is only a very
terse approximation of a social network - namely a *structured* series
of relations rather than just a list.

Marketing people are notorious for picking up on the buzz words and
superficial understanding of these phenomenon (sorry marketers on the
list, but I think this one holds true for many).

But if you actually map these relations I bet you'll find that
superconnectors still only have a small intelligible number of groups,
each one corresponding to a life context or specific event. They may
also have many single isolated fans, which from an egocentric
perspective are structurally equivalent. Consequently, they aren't
garbage in, they are just redundant and can be analyzed as such.

Take care,
BERNiE

On Tue, Feb 10, 2009 at 9:48 PM, June Holley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> I'm surprised more marketing arms haven't picked up on the New England
> Journal network studies on obesity and smoking cessation. Wasn't the point
> of both of those that it's not individuals but small overlapping clusters
> where - through interaction and engagement - small groups reframe norms and
> thus change behavior? And that change often cascades through the clusters?
>
> Who's taking that perspective on social networking sites?
>
> June
>
>
>
> June Holley
> Network Weaver
> www.networkweaving.com/june.html
> www.networkweaving.com/blog
> +1-740-591-4705
>
>
>
>
>
> On 02/10/09 4:11 PM, "Moore, Michael - McLean [USA]" <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>
>> This is true, although it is important to understand what network you are
>> observing.  Context is always important in SNA.
>>
>> For example, my college (Carleton) was one of the first ones on Facebook, when
>> it was still a higher-education-only service.  I have a large number of
>> Friends on Facebook that are true "weak-ties."  I don't communicate with them
>> regularly - but we both know eachother enough to exchange a greeting by name
>> if we saw one another.
>>
>> If your subjects of study are only a few egos who follow this pattern, your
>> analysis may still be valid.  Of course - once you begin to sample "friends of
>> friends" this logic fails.
>>
>> _________________________________________
>> Michael A. Moore :: [log in to unmask]
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum on behalf of Valdis Krebs
>> Sent: Tue 2/10/2009 4:06 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [SOCNET] applied SNA
>>
>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>
>> Just like volleyball... bump, set and spike!   I'm glad you mentioned
>> that, Ed.
>>
>> So many on-line networks are full of promiscuous linkers[PL] -- they'll
>> link with anyone!  They end up with many "false ties"  that they
>> believe are "weak ties".  When it comes time to use these imagined weak
>> ties, they fail -- unlike a real weak tie which brings benefits.
>>
>> People often hate to turn down a link request on FB, LI, & elsewhere,
>> even if they do not know the person.   By accepting link requests from
>> strangers, they accumulate many false ties [i.e. noise] that totally
>> screw up the social graph for anyone trying to make sense of it.  It
>> also gives the PL a false sense of their ego net.
>>
>> So, those of you salivating for FB data, be careful... remember GIGO.
>>
>> Valdis
>>
>> On Feb 10, 2009, at 3:35 PM, Edward Vielmetti wrote:
>>
>>> Note of course that every social network born that
>>> publicizes friend count has a population of people
>>> who play that network as a multiplayer game to
>>> collect the most friends.
>>>
>>> Some people do it to spam, some people do it for
>>> marketing, and some people truly have a lot of friends.
>>> It can be hard to tell from a simple count who is who.
>>>
>>> For a reference see Hefe in "Science Creative Quarterly" 3
>>> http://www.scq.ubc.ca/increase-the-n/
>>>
>>> thanks, and be my frend pleez,
>>>
>>> Ed
>>>
>>> On Tue, Feb 10, 2009 at 3:28 PM, Valdis Krebs <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>>>
>>>> Got this email today, thought SOCNET would be interested in how SNA is
>>>> currently applied in parts of the  business world...
>>>>
>>>>>  One of the most interesting metrics we find when we work with our
>>>>> customers is the Friend Count (number of friend links) for each of
>>>>> their
>>>>> consumers.  We see a repeatable curve in a typical client's consumer
>>>>> list:
>>>>> there are many consumers with zero friends; many with low numbers of
>>>>> friends, and then a targeted percentage that have 100 friends or
>>>>> more.
>>>>>
>>>>>  According to a Rapleaf study published in 2008*, about 80% of social
>>>>> media users have between 0-100 friends, and 20% have 100 or more
>>>>> friends:
>>>>> the 80-20 rule.
>>>>>
>>>>> In the world of social media, Friend Count is a key metric of the
>>>>> influence of each consumer.  A consumer who loves your brand and has
>>>>> 100
>>>>> online friends is much more valuable than a consumer with just one
>>>>> friend.
>>>>> And, of course, a consumer that has a bad experience with your
>>>>> product and
>>>>> has 300 friends is a concern multiplied. Many of our clients are now
>>>>> flagging high Friend Count consumers in their database both for a
>>>>> higher
>>>>> level of marketing and customer service.
>>>>
>>>> More data in their press release...
>>>>
>>>> http://is.gd/b4H
>>>>
>>>> Valdis
>>>>
>>>> _____________________________________________________________________
>>>> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
>>>> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
>>>> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
>>>> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Edward Vielmetti
>>> Ann Arbor, MI
>>>
>>> +1 734 330 2465
>>>
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________________
>> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
>> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
>> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
>> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>>
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________________
>> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
>> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
>> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
>> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.